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Nicole T. Gabana, Aaron D’Addario, Matteo Luzzeri, Stinne Soendergaard and Y. Joel Wong

.g., spiritual identification, religious practice) would inform the body of knowledge in both the positive psychology and sport psychology literature. Recent research has demonstrated initial support for the use of gratitude interventions in sport, as Gabana, Steinfeldt, Wong, Chung, and Svetina ( 2019 ) found increases in

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Maria Grazia Monaci and Francesca Veronesi

role identification. Generally, women are considered more “emotional” than men ( Brody, 1999 ; Fischer & LaFrance, 2015 ). However, Fabes and Martin ( 1991 ) have shown that, even if women do express emotions more than men ( Chaplin & Aldao, 2013 ; Johnson & Shulman, 1988 ), few gender differences

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Mitch Abrams and Michelle L. Bartlett

of the subspecialties of clinical psychology, sport psychology, and forensic psychology. This paper serves to provide an overview of context-specific approaches to pertinent identification and treatment issues. An overview of sexual abuse victim and perpetrator identification will be offered along

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Taylor K. Wise

/Intervention for Athletes with Eating Disorders (27) 2. Theme B: ED/Multidisciplinary Sports Medicine Treatment Team (25) 3. Theme C: Health/Safety Recognition Introduction (23) 4. Theme D: Prevention of Disordered Eating in Athletics (18) 5. Theme E: Identification: Signs/Symptoms/Behaviors (18) 6. Theme F

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Graig M. Chow, Matthew D. Bird, Stinne Soendergaard and Yanyun Yang

identity and encourages members to adopt values to motivate collective action that affirms social identification ( Slater, Coffee, Barker, & Evans, 2014 ). Research adopting a social identity perspective highlights the importance of leaders who can serve a protective function against maladaptive alcohol

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Bradley Donohue, Marina Galante, Julia Maietta, Bern Lee, Nina Paul, Joanne E. Perry, Arianna Corey and Daniel N. Allen

, including widespread implementation of screening measures to facilitate the identification of mental health conditions ( NCAA Sport Science and the NCAA, 2016 ). Screening for mental health conditions is a worthwhile prevention strategy, as early identification and treatment can reduce severity and duration

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Diane M. Wiese-Bjornstal, Kristin N. Wood, Amanda J. Wambach, Andrew C. White and Victor J. Rubio

 = 37), and perceived that they were mostly to very successful in recovery from this injury ( n  = 37). Measures Descriptive and quantitative measures of R/S included participant religious and/or spiritual identifications, and reliable and valid measures of religious commitment and health locus of

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Jim Taylor

This article explores the challenges of building a successful private consulting practice in sport psychology. The author examines the extant literature on the experiences of recent graduates as they enter the field of applied sport psychology and also describes how his own educational and early career experiences have shaped his practice. A four-part approach to consulting with athletes is outlined, along with detailed information regarding practice development, clientele identification, and fee structures. The personal qualities essential for creating a successful consulting practice in sport psychology are also explored. Finally, a five-stage model of career development provides guidelines for maintaining and growing a successful consulting practice.

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Robert J. Schinke, Randy C. Battochio, Timothy V. Dube, Ronnie Lidor, Gershon Tenenbaum and Andrew M. Lane

Sport researchers have considered the processes that elite athletes undergo to achieve positive psychological adaptation during significant chronic stressors throughout sport careers and also, acute stressors within important competitions. This review contains a description of competitive and organizational stressors that can hamper an elite athlete’s pursuit of adaptation within the aforementioned circumstances, followed by an identification of the responses that together can foster the desired outcome of adaptation. The authors propose that there are four parts that contribute to an elite athlete’s positive psychological adaptation, presented as parts of a process: (a) the appraisal of stressors, (b) coping strategies, (c) self-regulation strategies, and (d) a consolidated adaptation response. Subsequently, athlete adaptation is considered through examples taken from anecdotal literature and formal research studies pertaining to elite athlete adaptation. Implications are discussed for sport psychologists, mental training consultants, sport scientists, coaches, and athletes.

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Aditi Mankad, Sandy Gordon and Karen Wallman

The present study adopted a qualitative, exploratory approach to describe the underlying emotional climate among injured athletes within team sport environments. Nine elite athletes undergoing long-term injury rehabilitation (LTIR) participated in semi-structured interviews to describe their LTIR experience. A general inductive analysis extracted three higher-order themes: (a) emotional trauma, (b) emotional climate, and (c) emotional acting. Athletes reported experiencing emotional trauma throughout LTIR. To maintain in-group norms, they described engaging in avoidance behaviors and reported suppressing negative affect for fear of negative evaluation. They also reported frequently controlling emotions in public using acting strategies. Athletes perceived these emotionally inhibitive behaviors as encouraged within their team environment. These results have important implications for the identification and treatment of emotionally destructive behaviors that could potentially delay an athlete’s psychological rehabilitation from athletic injury.