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Tamara C. Valovich McLeod, Megan N. Houston, and Cailee E. Welch

Concussions resulting from sports and recreational activities are a significant concern in the pediatric population. The number of children and adolescents sustaining sport-related concussions is increasing and, as a result, legislation has been passed in all 50 states to ensure appropriate recognition and referral of pediatric athletes following concussion. The developing brain may make the diagnosis, assessment, and management of concussion more challenging for health care providers and requires the use of specific age-appropriate assessment tools. Concussion management must also include considerations for cognitive and physical rest, a collaborative concussion management team that includes medical and school personnel, and more conservative stepwise progressions for returning to school and to physical activity.

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Charles R. Thompson

The incidence of concussions and potential for long-term health effects has captured the attention of the media, general public, medical professionals, parents, and obviously the athletes themselves. Concussions have been blamed for a variety of mental and physical health issues. The athletic trainer is at the forefront of the concussion management team, as they are typically on the scene when the concussion occurs and are often the first medical personnel to evaluate and, hopefully, remove the athlete from activity. There has been controversy of late regarding the influence of coaches in the care of concussed athletes. Therefore, a move to the “medical model” of sports medicine management can go a long way in resolving conflict of interest issues regarding the care of concussed athletes. A comprehensive concussion team and protocol are also essential to providing the highest level of care. This article takes a closer look at concussion management in the collegiate arena, with a particular focus on Princeton University.

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Matt Ventresca and Samantha King

controversial race-norming techniques that it made it harder for Black players to score low enough on neurocognitive assessments to qualify for settlement payments ( Ventresca & Henne, 2020 ). In response to escalating backlash and public pressure, the NFL stopped making race-based adjustments in determining

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Tracey Covassin, Kyle M. Petit, and Morgan Anderson

using validated age-appropriate neurocognitive assessments. Previous research has also examined sex differences with regard to neurocognitive impairments after SRC. Overall, the literature is inconsistent on whether there are sex differences in youth athletes under the age of 13 years. This could be due