Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 203 items for :

  • "organization" x
  • Sport and Exercise Science/Kinesiology x
  • Physical Education and Coaching x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Patrick Ward, Johann Windt and Thomas Kempton

Sport science, the application of scientific principles to inform practice, 1 has become increasingly common as professional sporting organizations seek to gain a performance advantage. These organizations increasingly employ sport scientists from varying backgrounds including physiology, strength

Restricted access

K. Andrew R. Richards, Wesley J. Wilson, Steven K. Holland and Justin A. Haegele

work with physical educators who are unsupportive and may unknowingly employ exclusionary teaching practices ( Haegele & Zhu, 2017 ). Thus, the purpose of this study was to extend the research on the socialization of PE teachers by examining the relationships among perceived organizational support (POS

Restricted access

Marit Sørensen and Nina Kahrs

The Norwegian Olympic Committee and Confederation of Sports’ commitment to integrate disability sport in the sport organizations for the able-bodied was evaluated based upon a description of an ideal, inclusive sports organization. Data were collected primarily through interviews and questionnaires. The results indicate that the integration process proceeded more slowly than originally intended. There were still unresolved matters on the structural/organizational level, and the sports federations’ officials were uncertain about the extent of their responsibility and the role of the new sports organization for persons with a disability. More relevant competence was needed in the organization. All organizations reported improved attitudes toward individuals with a disability and indicated that integration was a demanding enterprise.

Full access

Joanne G. Mirtschin, Sara F. Forbes, Louise E. Cato, Ida A. Heikura, Nicki Strobel, Rebecca Hall and Louise M. Burke

The authors describe the implementation of a 3-week dietary intervention in elite race walkers at the Australian Institute of Sport, with a focus on the resources and strategies needed to accomplish a complex study of this scale. Interventions involved: traditional guidelines of high carbohydrate (CHO) availability for all training sessions; a periodized CHO diet which integrated sessions with low and high CHO availability within the same total CHO intake; and a ketogenic low-CHO high-fat diet. Seven-day menus and recipes were constructed for a communal eating setting to meet nutritional goals as well as individualized food preferences and special needs. Menus also included nutrition support before, during, and after exercise. Daily monitoring, via observation and food checklists, showed that energy and macronutrient targets were achieved. Diets were matched for energy (∼14.8 MJ/d) and protein (∼2.1 g·kg−1·day−1) and achieved desired differences for fat and CHO, with high CHO availability and periodized CHO availability: CHO = 8.5 g·kg−1·day−1, 60% energy, fat = 20% of energy and low-CHO high-fat diet: 0.5 g·kg−1·day−1 CHO, fat = 78% energy.  There were no differences in micronutrient intake or density between the high CHO availability and periodized CHO availability diets; however, the micronutrient density of the low-CHO high-fat diet was significantly lower. Daily food costs per athlete were similar for each diet (∼AU$ 27 ± 10). Successful implementation and monitoring of dietary interventions in sports nutrition research of the scale of the present study require meticulous planning and the expertise of chefs and sports dietitians. Different approaches to sports nutrition support raise practical challenges around cost, micronutrient density, accommodation of special needs, and sustainability.

Restricted access

Bent R. Rønnestad and Joar Hansen

BP has taken different forms according to the positions and experiences of those who presented them. 2 It has been indicated that BP is superior to traditional organization of training despite the fact that total volume and intensity of the training are similar. 3 However, studies with this

Restricted access

Alaaddine El-Chab and Miriam E. Clegg

In 2010, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) published the first edition of guidelines for standardizing the determination of the glycemic index (GI) of foods for practice and research purposes ( International Standards Office, 2010 ). According to the report, subjects should

Restricted access

Martin C. Waller, Deborah A. Kerr, Martyn J. Binnie, Emily Eaton, Clare Wood, Terreen Stenvers, Daniel F. Gucciardi, Carmel Goodman and Kagan J. Ducker

, where athletes sourced their supplements, influences on supplement use/nonuse, and self-reported knowledge of supplements were assessed. Additionally, knowledge of national sporting organization, institute, and anti-doping policies (Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority and World Anti-Doping Agency

Restricted access

Mathew Hillier, Louise Sutton, Lewis James, Dara Mojtahedi, Nicola Keay and Karen Hind

, constituting the largest inquiry to date, call for urgent action from MMA organizations to safeguard the health and well-being of athletes competing in this sport. Acknowledgments The study was designed by M. Hillier, K. Hind, L. Sutton, and L. James; data were collected and analyzed by M. Hillier, D

Restricted access

Mark Kenneally, Arturo Casado and Jordan Santos-Concejero

, but presents evidence (when analyzed retrospectively) for the organization of high-intensity training into zones based on a percentage of race pace, rather than physiological zones, which appears to be relatively consistent across distances. A training session at a given percentage of race pace for a