Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for :

  • "park features" x
  • Psychology and Behavior in Sport/Exercise x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Ariane L. Rung, Andrew J. Mowen, Stephanie T. Broyles, and Jeanette Gustat

Background:

Neighborhood parks play an important role in promoting physical activity. We examined the effect of activity area, condition, and presence of supporting features on number of park users and park-based physical activity levels.

Methods:

37 parks and 154 activity areas within parks were assessed during summer 2008 for their features and park-based physical activity. Outcomes included any park use, number of park users, mean and total energy expenditure. Independent variables included type and condition of activity area, supporting features, size of activity area, gender, and day of week. Multilevel models controlled for clustering of observations at activity area and park levels.

Results:

Type of activity area was associated with number of park users, mean and total energy expenditure, with basketball courts having the highest number of users and total energy expenditure, and playgrounds having the highest mean energy expenditure. Condition of activity areas was positively associated with number of basketball court users and inversely associated with number of green space users and total green space energy expenditure. Various supporting features were both positively and negatively associated with each outcome.

Conclusions:

This study provides evidence regarding characteristics of parks that can contribute to achieving physical activity goals within recreational spaces.

Restricted access

Karry Dolash, Meizi He, Zenong Yin, and Erica T. Sosa

Background:

Park features’ association with physical activity among predominantly Hispanic communities is not extensively researched. The purpose of this study was to assess factors associated with park use and physical activity among park users in predominantly Hispanic neighborhoods.

Methods:

Data were collected across 6 parks and included park environmental assessments to evaluate park features, physical activity observations to estimate physical activity energy expenditure as kcal/kg/minute per person, and park user interviews to assess motivators for park use. Quantitative data analysis included independent t tests and ANOVA. Thematic analysis of park user interviews was conducted collectively and by parks.

Results:

Parks that were renovated had higher physical activity energy expenditure scores (mean = .086 ± .027) than nonrenovated parks (mean = .077 ± .028; t = −3.804; P < .01). Basketball courts had a significantly higher number of vigorously active park users (mean = 1.84 ± .08) than tennis courts (mean = .15 ± .01; F = 21.9, η2 = 6.1%, P < .01). Thematic analysis of qualitative data revealed 4 emerging themes—motivation to be physically active, using the play spaces in the park, parks as the main place for physical activity, and social support for using parks.

Conclusion:

Renovations to park amenities, such as increasing basketball courts and trail availability, could potentially increase physical activity among low-socioeconomic-status populations.

Restricted access

Evie Leslie, Ester Cerin, and Peter Kremer

Background:

Access to local parks can affect walking levels. Neighborhood environment and park use may influence relationships between neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and walking.

Methods:

Self-report data on perceived park features, neighborhood environment, park use, neighborhood walking and sociodemographics were obtained from a sample of Australian adults, living in high/low SES areas. Surveys were mailed to 250 randomly selected households within 500m of 12 matched parks. Mediating effects of perceived environment attributes and park use on relationships between area-SES and walking were examined.

Results:

Mean frequency of local park use was higher for high-SES residents (4.36 vs 3.16 times/wk, P < .01), who also reported higher levels of park safety, maintenance, attractiveness, opportunities for socialization, and neighborhood crime safety, aesthetics, and traffic safety. Safety and opportunity for socialization were independently positively related to monthly frequency of visits to a local park which, in turn, was positively associated with walking for recreation and total walking. Residents of higher SES areas reported an average 22% (95% CI: 5%, 37%) more weekly minutes of recreational walking than their low SES counterparts.

Conclusion:

Residents of high-SES areas live in environments that promote park use, which positively contributes to their weekly amounts of overall and recreational walking.

Restricted access

Viviene Temple, Ryan Rhodes, and Joan Wharf Higgins

Background:

Walking has been identified as a low resourced yet effective means of achieving physical activity levels required for optimal health. From studies conducted around the world, we know that dog owners walk more than nondog owners. However, this evidence is largely self-reported which may not accurately reflect dog-owners’ behaviors.

Method:

To address this concern, we systematically observed the use of 6 different public parks in Victoria, British Columbia during fair and inclement weather. Using a modified version of the SOPARC tool, we documented visitors’ types of physical activity, and the presence or absence of dogs. The Physical Activity Resource Assessment was used to consider park features, amenities, and incivilities.

Results:

More people without dogs (73%) visited the parks than those with dogs (27%), largely because of attendance at the multiuse sport parks during the summer months. Despite the opportunities to engage in multiple sports, most people used the parks to walk. However, when inclement weather struck, dog owners continued visiting parks and sustained their walking practices significantly more than nondog owners.

Conclusion:

Our observational snapshot of park use supports earlier work that dogs serve as a motivational support for their owners’ walking practices through fair and foul weather.

Restricted access

Joseph T. Walker, Andrew J. Mowen, William W. Hendricks, Judy Kruger, James R. Morrow Jr., and Kelly Bricker

Background:

The Physical Activity in Parks Setting (PA-PS) instrument is a series of survey questions designed by a consortium of public health and leisure research scholars to gauge park-based physical activity for use in civilian, noninstitutionalized populations. This paper introduces this self-reported instrument and provides test-retest reliability results.

Methods:

Data to test the instrument reliability were collected during 2 waves in 2008 through the California Outdoor Recreation Opinions and Attitudes Telephone Survey. To conduct test-retest reliability we examined the agreement between 100 randomly reselected respondents from the first wave of respondents (n = 2004) that answered the same survey within 21 to 30 days of the initial administration.

Results:

The reliability of measures that categorized individual park use and visitation with others provided moderate levels of agreement (Kappa = 0.44 to 0.64). Questions about park features, facilities and amenity use, and specific park-based physical activity participation were of fair to substantial agreement (Kappa = 0.21 to 0.90) depending on the item in question.

Conclusion:

The results from these test-retest reliability analyses suggest the PA-PS items were reliable and should be considered in future population surveys that assess park visitation patterns and park-based physical activity levels.

Restricted access

Carrie M. Geremia, Kelli L. Cain, Terry L. Conway, James F. Sallis, and Brian E. Saelens

them are lengthy, costly to use, or have rarely been validated for their ability to explain park use, PA, or other outcomes. 20 For example, the EAPRS instrument is a reliable and comprehensive measure of park features and quality. 17 EAPRS has been used to examine whether the number of park features

Restricted access

Lene Levy-Storms, Lin Chen, and Anastasia Loukaitou-Sideris

well-being, even for frail older adults. A Person–Environment and Life Span Perspective on Older Adults’ Needs for Physical Activity Although open spaces and parks may be enjoyed for passive recreation and relaxation, most of the literature examines park features associated with active use and

Restricted access

Jeanette Gustat, Christopher E. Anderson, and Sandy J. Slater

. Edwards N , Hooper P , Knuiman M , Foster S , Giles-Corti B . Associations between park features and adolescent park use for physical activity . Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act . 2015 ; 12 : 21 . PubMed ID: 25879200 doi:10.1186/s12966-015-0178-4 25879200 10.1186/s12966-015-0178-4

Restricted access

Diana Marina Camargo, Paula Camila Ramírez, Vanesa Quiroga, Paola Ríos, Rogério César Férmino, and Olga L. Sarmiento

-use, preferences of park features, and physical activity among city residents varying in socioeconomic status . 2014 . http://thescholarship.ecu.edu/bitstream/handle/10342/4577/Pineda_ecu_0600O_11214.pdf?sequence=1 . Accessed November 21, 2017. 29. Floyd MF , Spengler JO , Maddock JE , Gobster PH

Restricted access

Estela Farías-Torbidoni, Demir Barić, and Sebastià Mas-Alòs

park features and the mission of the agency managing the park 14 because variation of activities rather than walking may not be suitable due to park regulations. Several research studies and governmental reports provide a broad range of possibilities for park managers targeting different determinants