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Leon Straker, Erin Kaye Howie, Dylan Paul Cliff, Melanie T. Davern, Lina Engelen, Sjaan R. Gomersall, Jenny Ziviani, Natasha K. Schranz, Tim Olds, and Grant Ryan Tomkinson

Background:

Australia has joined a growing number of nations that have evaluated the physical activity and sedentary behavior status of their children. Australia received a “D minus” in the first Active Healthy Kids Australia Physical Activity Report Card.

Methods:

An expert subgroup of the Australian Report Card Research Working Group iteratively reviewed available evidence to answer 3 questions: (a) What are the main sedentary behaviors of children? (b) What are the potential mechanisms for sedentary behavior to impact child health and development? and (c) What are the effects of different types of sedentary behaviors on child health and development?

Results:

Neither sedentary time nor screen time is a homogeneous activity likely to result in homogenous effects. There are several mechanisms by which various sedentary behaviors may positively or negatively affect cardiometabolic, neuromusculoskeletal, and psychosocial health, though the strength of evidence varies. National surveillance systems and mechanistic, longitudinal, and experimental studies are needed for Australia and other nations to improve their grade.

Conclusions:

Despite limitations, available evidence is sufficiently convincing that the total exposure and pattern of exposure to sedentary behaviors are critical to the healthy growth, development, and wellbeing of children. Nations therefore need strategies to address these common behaviors.

Open access

Brigid M. Lynch, Charles E. Matthews, Katrien Wijndaele, and on behalf of the Sedentary Behaviour Council of the International Society for Physical Activity and Health

MEDLINE searches at various levels of specificity. Systematic reviews that utilize MEDLINE rely heavily on the database’s controlled vocabulary to identify relevant publications. One of the first projects initiated by the Sedentary Behaviour Council of the International Society for Physical Activity and

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Katherine L. Downing, Trina Hinkley, and Kylie D. Hesketh

Background:

There is little current understanding of the influences on sedentary behavior and screen time in preschool children. This study investigated socioeconomic position (SEP) and parental rules as potential correlates of preschool children’s sedentary behavior and screen time.

Methods:

Data from the Healthy Active Preschool Years (HAPPY) Study were used. Participating parents reported their child’s usual weekly screen time and their rules to regulate their child’s screen time. Children wore accelerometers for 8 days to objectively measure sedentary time.

Results:

Children whose parents limited television viewing spent significantly less time in that behavior and in total screen time; however, overall sedentary behavior was unaffected. An association between parents limiting computer/electronic game use and time spent on the computer was found for girls only. SEP was inversely associated with girls’, but not boys’, total screen time and television viewing.

Conclusions:

As parental rules were generally associated with lower levels of screen time, intervention strategies could potentially encourage parents to set limits on, and switch off, screen devices. Intervention strategies should target preschool children across all SEP areas, as there was no difference by SEP in overall sedentary behavior or screen time for boys.

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Paddy C. Dempsey, Chuck E. Matthews, S. Ghazaleh Dashti, Aiden R. Doherty, Audrey Bergouignan, Eline H. van Roekel, David W. Dunstan, Nicholas J. Wareham, Thomas E. Yates, Katrien Wijndaele, and Brigid M. Lynch

bias—will be required. This paper stems from a recent research workshop ( http://www.mrc-epid.cam.ac.uk/ispahsedentary18/ ) organized by the Sedentary Behavior Council themed “Sedentary behaviour mechanisms—biological and behavioural pathways linking sitting to adverse health outcomes” which was held

Open access

Lowri C. Edwards, Richard Tyler, Dylan Blain, Anna Bryant, Neil Canham, Lauren Carter-Davies, Cain Clark, Tim Evans, Ceri Greenall, Julie Hobday, Anwen Jones, Marianne Mannello, Emily Marchant, Maggie Miller, Graham Moore, Kelly Morgan, Sarah Nicholls, Chris Roberts, Michael Sheldrick, Karen Thompson, Nalda Wainwright, Malcolm Ward, Simon Williams, and Gareth Stratton

synthesis and expert consensus of the best available evidence. The ten indicators included: Overall Physical Activity, Organised Sport and Physical Activity, Active Play, Active Transportation, Sedentary Behaviours, Physical Fitness, Family and Peers, School, Community and Environment and Government. In

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Jasmin Bhawra, Priyanka Chopra, Ranjani Harish, Anjana Mohan, Krishnaveni V. Ghattu, Kumaran Kalyanaraman, and Tarun R. Katapally

Introduction Research demonstrates that almost half of children and youth in India do not meet recommended guidelines for physical activity and sedentary behaviour. 1 The 2016 India Report Card identified several gaps in evidence, including nationally representative data on active living and

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Mark S. Tremblay

, 17 In April 2019, the WHO also rectified the earlier omission of the physical activity guidelines for the early years with the release of WHO Guidelines on Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour and Sleep for Children under 5 years of age. 18 Not only did this release of global guidelines cover the

Open access

Vida K. Nyawornota, Austin Luguterah, Seidu Sofo, Richmond Aryeetey, Margaret Badasu, John Nartey, Emmanuel Assasie, Samuel K. Donkor, Vivian Dougblor, Helena Williams, and Reginald Ocansey

Physical Activity, Organized Sport and Physical Activity Participation, Active Play, Active Transportation, Sedentary Behaviours, Physical Fitness, Family and Peers, School, Community and Environment, and Government. Experts in the working group appraised the available evidence, discussed discrepancies

Open access

Asaduzzaman Khan, Mohammad Abdul Kadir, Sohel Reza Choudhury, Fatema Ashraf, Mahbubur Rahman, Kazi Rumana Ahmed, K. M. Saif-Ur-Rahman, Sonia Parvin, and Riaz Uddin

th indicator not included in the table. Sedentary behaviour of the adolescents in Bangladesh seems to be satisfactory with 85% having ≤2 hr/day of sitting time. 2 However, three out of five adolescents had insufficient PA. 2 A similar proportion of adolescents reported that they do not use active

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Javier Brazo-Sayavera, Cecilia del Campo, María José Rodríguez, Inacio Crochemore Mohnsam da Silva, Eugenio Merellano-Navarro, and Pedro R. Olivares

active transportation (e.g., walking, bicycling) to and from school 4 or more days per week. 6 Sedentary Behaviours C- 41.7% of adolescents ranged between 13 and 15 years old reached the recommendations of not more than 2 hours per day in sedentary behaviours (sitting activities). Physical Fitness C- 40