Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 35 items for :

  • "simulator" x
  • Athletic Training, Therapy, and Rehabilitation x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Nicole L. Hoffman, Hannes Devos, and Julianne D. Schmidt

symptom checklists, paper-and-pencil neuropsychological assessment battery, and driving simulator. He did not report a history of any neurologic disorder or injury, did not use drugs or alcohol heavily, and was not taking any medications that caused drowsiness at the time. He had not been involved in any

Restricted access

Chih-Hung Chen, Ming-Chang Jeng, Chin-Ping Fung, Ji-Liang Doong, and Tien-Yow Chuang

Context:

Whether virtual rehabilitation is beneficial has not been determined.

Objective:

To investigate the psychological benefits of virtual reality in rehabilitation.

Design:

An experimental group underwent therapy with a virtual-reality-based exercise bike, and a control group underwent the therapy without virtual-reality equipment.

Setting:

Hospital laboratory.

Patients:

30 patients suffering from spinal-cord injury.

Intervention:

A designed rehabilitation therapy.

Main Outcome Measures:

Endurance, Borg's rating-of-perceived-exertion scale, the Activation–Deactivation Adjective Check List (AD-ACL), and the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire.

Results:

The differences between the experimental and control groups were significant for AD-ACL calmness and tension.

Conclusion:

A virtual-reality-based rehabilitation program can ease patients' tension and induce calm.

Restricted access

Robert Stow

Restricted access

Leah S. Goudy, Brandon Rhett Rigby, Lisa Silliman-French, and Kevin A. Becker

, Papadakis, Bane, Park, & Grandjean, 2015 ). By removing the affect between the rider and the horse, the physical changes (e.g., balance, posture) that occur with habitual horseback riding may be more readily quantified during SHBR. A horseback riding simulator is a novel device that can accurately represent

Restricted access

Stacy Walker and Ashley B. Thrasher

Restricted access

Louis M. Ferreira, Graham J.W. King, and James A. Johnson

., Peterborough, ON) to keep the soft tissues moist during testing. The humeral clamp allowed unconstrained elbow motion, while rigidly affixing the humerus to the motion simulator. The simulator itself was mounted to a 2-degree-of-freedom universal joint, which permitted orientation of the arm in the dependent

Restricted access

Jonathan R. Kusins, Ryan Willing, Graham J.W. King, and Louis M. Ferreira

A computational elbow joint model was developed with a main goal of providing complimentary data to experimental results. The computational model was developed and validated using an experimental elbow joint phantom consisting of a linked total joint replacement. An established in-vitro motion simulator was used to actively flex/extend the experimental elbow in multiple orientations. Muscle forces predicted by the computational model were similar to the experimental model in 4 out of the 5 orientations with errors less than 7.5 N. Valgus angle kinematics were in agreement with differences less than 2.3°. In addition, changes in radial head length, a clinically relevant condition following elbow reconstruction, were simulated in both models and compared. Both lengthening and shortening of the radial head prosthesis altered muscle forces by less than 3.5 N in both models, and valgus angles agreed within 1°. The computational model proved valuable in cross validation with the experimental model, elucidating important limitations in the in-vitro motion simulator’s controller. With continued development, the computational model can be a complimentary tool to experimental studies by providing additional noninvasive outcome measurements.

Restricted access

Michael W. Holmes, Scott N. MacKinnon, Julie Matthews, Wayne J. Albert, and Steven Mills

Seafaring occupations have been shown to place operators at an increased risk for injury. The purpose of this study was to understand better the demands of a moving environment on the ability of a person to perform specific lifting tasks. Subjects lifted a 15-kg load under four different lifting conditions. A 6-degree-of-freedom ship motion simulator imposed repeatable deck motions under foot while subjects executed the lifting tasks. Subjects were oriented in three different positions on the simulator floor to inflict different motion profiles. Electromyographic records of four muscles were collected bilaterally, and thoracolumbar kinematics were measured. A repeated-measures ANOVA was employed to assess trunk motions and muscle activities across lifting and motion conditions. The erector spinae muscles showed a trend toward significant differences for motion effects. Maximal sagittal velocities were significantly smaller for all motion states in comparison with the stable condition (p ≤ .01), whereas maximum twisting and lateral bending velocities were higher (p ≤ .05). Results suggest working in a moving environment will likely increase the operator’s risk for overexertion injuries, particularly to the trunk region.

Restricted access

Li Jin, Peter G. Adamczyk, Michelle Roland, and Michael E. Hahn

Lower limb amputation has been associated with secondary impairments such as knee osteoarthritis in the uninvolved limb. Greater knee loading in the frontal plane has been related to severity and rate of progression in knee osteoarthritis. Reduced push-off work from the involved limb can increase uninvolved limb knee loading. However, little is known about specific effects that prosthetic foot damping may have on uninvolved limb loading. We hypothesized that uninvolved limb peak knee internal abduction moment (IAM) and loading rates would be greater when using a high-damping foot compared with a low-damping foot, across walking speeds. Eight healthy, young subjects walked in a prosthesis simulator boot using the experimental feet. Greater uninvolved limb first peak IAM (+16% in fast speed, P = .002; +11% in slow speed, P = .001) and loading rates (+11% in fast speed, P = .003) were observed when using the high-damping foot compared with low-damping foot. Within each foot, uninvolved limb first peak IAM and loading rates had a trend to increase with increased walking speed. These findings suggest that damping properties of prosthetic feet are related to uninvolved limb peak knee IAM and loading rates.

Restricted access

Alicia M. Koontz, Lynn A. Worobey, Ian M. Rice, Jennifer L. Collinger, and Michael L. Boninger

Laboratory-based simulators afford many advantages for studying physiology and biomechanics; however, they may not perfectly mimic wheelchair propulsion over natural surfaces. The goal of this study was to compare kinetic and temporal parameters between propulsion overground on a tile surface and on a dynamometer. Twenty-four experienced manual wheelchair users propelled at a self-selected speed on smooth, level tile and a dynamometer while kinetic data were collected using an instrumented wheel. A Pearson correlation test was used to examine the relationship between propulsion variables obtained on the dynamometer and the overground condition. Ensemble resultant force and moment curves were compared using cross-correlation and qualitative analysis of curve shape. User biomechanics were correlated (R ranging from 0.41 to 0.83) between surfaces. Overall, findings suggest that although the dynamometer does not perfectly emulate overground propulsion, wheelchair users were consistent with the direction and amount of force applied, the time peak force was reached, push angle, and their stroke frequency between conditions.