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Rory Mack, Jeff Breckon, Joanne Butt, and Ian Maynard

Sport Theme Subthemes MI applied tools Elicit-Provide-Elicit Agenda mapping Values sort Scaling rulers (importance; confidence; readiness) Goal setting MI-consistent sharing information and expertise Consider the therapeutic alliance Dialogue not monologue Collaboration Athlete autonomy Athlete as

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Rory Mack, Jeff Breckon, Joanne Butt, and Ian Maynard

The purpose of this study was to explore how sport and exercise psychologists working in sport understand and use motivational interviewing (MI). Eleven practitioners participated in semistructured interviews, and inductive thematic analysis identified themes linked to explicit use of MI, such as building engagement and exploring ambivalence to change; the value of MI, such as enhancing the relationship, rolling with resistance and integrating with other approaches; and barriers to the implementation of MI in sport psychology, such as a limited evidence-base in sport. Findings also indicated considerable implicit use of MI by participants, including taking an athlete-centered approach, supporting athlete autonomy, reflective listening, demonstrating accurate empathy, and taking a nonprescriptive, guiding role. This counseling style appears to have several tenets to enhance current practice in sport psychology, not least the enhancement of therapeutic alliance.

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Rory J. Mack, Jeff D. Breckon, Paul D. O’Halloran, and Joanne Butt

delivered in conversations with athletes. For example, the specific communication strategies used (and not used), specific models and tools implemented, conscious processes in cultivating a therapeutic alliance, recognition of athlete readiness for an intervention, structures that guide practitioner

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Martin J. Turner, Gillian Aspin, Faye F. Didymus, Rory Mack, Peter Olusoga, Andrew G. Wood, and Richard Bennett

.g., relating to attitudes, expectations), and automatic thoughts. Rather than being a philosophical modality like REBT, CT is a more concrete approach that focuses on the therapeutic alliance to develop, among other things, unconditional other acceptance (i.e., the understanding that others can accept us

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Tom O. Mitchell, Ian H.J. Cowburn, David Piggott, Martin A. Littlewood, Tony Cook, and Kevin Till

mechanisms and the discourse of identity: The creation of ‘silence’ in an elite sports academy . Culture and Organization, 22 ( 3 ), 221 – 244 . https://doi.org/10.1080/14759551.2016.1160092 Martin , D.J. , Garske , J.P. , & Davis , M.K. ( 2000 ). Reflection of the therapeutic alliance with

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Artur Poczwardowski, Mark Aoyagi, Thomas Fritze, and Mark Laird

, & Schulte, 2011 ), and even more broadly it has been long discussed under the construct of therapeutic alliance that involves trust, agreement on therapeutic goals, and collaboration on mutually negotiated tasks (e.g.,  Bordin, 1979 ; see also Mack, Breckon, O’Halloran, & Butt, 2018 for a case study in