Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 20 items for :

  • "therapeutic alliance" x
  • Psychology and Behavior in Sport/Exercise x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Open access

Andrew Powell

The purpose of this narrative review is to highlight the potential relevance of therapeutic alliance as a concept to aid the conceptualization, design, and development of effective interventions that aim to increase the physical activity (PA) levels of older adults. Therapeutic alliance has been

Open access

TO OUR READERS: The copyright has changed in the ahead of print version of the following article: Powell, A. Therapeutic alliance and its potential application to physical activity interventions for older adults: A narrative review. Journal of Aging and Physical Activity . Advance online

Restricted access

Rory Mack, Jeff Breckon, Joanne Butt, and Ian Maynard

Sport Theme Subthemes MI applied tools Elicit-Provide-Elicit Agenda mapping Values sort Scaling rulers (importance; confidence; readiness) Goal setting MI-consistent sharing information and expertise Consider the therapeutic alliance Dialogue not monologue Collaboration Athlete autonomy Athlete as

Restricted access

Rory Mack, Jeff Breckon, Joanne Butt, and Ian Maynard

The purpose of this study was to explore how sport and exercise psychologists working in sport understand and use motivational interviewing (MI). Eleven practitioners participated in semistructured interviews, and inductive thematic analysis identified themes linked to explicit use of MI, such as building engagement and exploring ambivalence to change; the value of MI, such as enhancing the relationship, rolling with resistance and integrating with other approaches; and barriers to the implementation of MI in sport psychology, such as a limited evidence-base in sport. Findings also indicated considerable implicit use of MI by participants, including taking an athlete-centered approach, supporting athlete autonomy, reflective listening, demonstrating accurate empathy, and taking a nonprescriptive, guiding role. This counseling style appears to have several tenets to enhance current practice in sport psychology, not least the enhancement of therapeutic alliance.

Restricted access

Rory J. Mack, Jeff D. Breckon, Paul D. O’Halloran, and Joanne Butt

delivered in conversations with athletes. For example, the specific communication strategies used (and not used), specific models and tools implemented, conscious processes in cultivating a therapeutic alliance, recognition of athlete readiness for an intervention, structures that guide practitioner

Restricted access

Martin J. Turner, Gillian Aspin, Faye F. Didymus, Rory Mack, Peter Olusoga, Andrew G. Wood, and Richard Bennett

.g., relating to attitudes, expectations), and automatic thoughts. Rather than being a philosophical modality like REBT, CT is a more concrete approach that focuses on the therapeutic alliance to develop, among other things, unconditional other acceptance (i.e., the understanding that others can accept us

Restricted access

Natalie S. Sherry, Abigail Feder, Raymond Pan, Shawn R. Eagle, and Anthony P. Kontos

strong therapeutic alliance with the athlete that may not be present with other members of the multidisciplinary team. Furthermore, sometimes the patients may not feel as comfortable sharing doubts of recovery or frustrations because patients feel that they may disappoint the neuropsychologist and other

Restricted access

Zachary C. Merz, Joanne E. Perry, and Michael J. Ross

rationale for Trent’s decision to communicate this with his teammates and coaching staff without the knowledge of the clinician is unknown. There are many reasons why he may have acted in this manner. The most concerning, from a psychological therapeutic alliance perspective, is the potential belief that

Restricted access

Krista Van Slingerland, Natalie Durand-Bush, Poppy DesClouds, and Göran Kenttä

layer of expertise that affects the “fit” and therapeutic alliance a client is able to form with CCMHS practitioners. Thus, the center assigns a minimum of two practitioners (i.e., a lead and a support) to each collaborative-care team (CCT) to maximize the specialization of support available to clients

Restricted access

Roy David Samuel

support, with the second-season referees experiencing a significantly longer process than the other 2 referees (see Table  1 ). With all 4 referees, I had a strong therapeutic alliance (see Samuel & Tenenbaum, 2011b ), as we had previously met in various professional settings. Still, the ability to reach