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Madeleine Vincent-Morin and Lucile Lafont

The goal of this study was to identify the relationships between the learning choices made by pupils and their personal characteristics, including cognitive style (field dependence–independence), a motivational variable (feeling of self-efficacy), and a cognitive variable (task representation). The participants were 64 twelve-year-old sixth graders from a suburban middle school in France (35 boys and 29 girls). Cognitive style or FDI was measured with the Group Embedded Figures Test, a perceptual test that requires finding a simple geometrical figure embedded in a complex geometrical one. Five learning conditions (autonomy, tutoring, verbal instruction, silent demonstration, and verbal demonstration) were then proposed in random order to the pupils. They were asked to select a learning method to solve a motor problem: a badminton service. The results indicated an absence of relationships between the choice of a learning condition and cognitive style. Three variables partially predicted the learning-condition choice: feeling of self-efficacy, task representation, and motor performance. The present results can be interpreted in the light of studies on children’s help-seeking behavior in problem-solving situations.

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Priscila Tamplain, E. Kipling Webster, Ali Brian, and Nadia C. Valentini

communication, gross motor, fine motor, problem solving, and personal-social domains. The Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire (DCDQ; Wilson et al., 2009 ) is also widely used to assess for the probability of DCD in children. In settings where it is impossible to assess the motor development of

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Brittany G. Travers, Heather L. Kirkorian, Matthew J. Jiang, Koeun Choi, Karl S. Rosengren, Porter Pavalko, and Paul Jobin

young child across five domains: communication, gross motor, fine motor, problem solving, and personal-social. We selected this instrument because of its ability to measure development as a function of age-specific milestones across multiple domains during early childhood. This would help inform us of