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Open access

Scott W. Cheatham and Russell Baker

Context: Floss bands are a popular intervention used by sports medicine professionals to enhance myofascial function and mobility. The bands are often wrapped around a region of the body in an overlapping fashion (eg, 50%) and then tensioned by stretching the band to a desired length (eg, 50%). To date, no research has investigated the stretch force of the bands at different elongation lengths. Objective: The purpose of this clinical study was to quantify the Rockfloss® band stretch force at 6 different elongation lengths (ie, 25%–150%) for the 5.08- and 10.16-cm width bands. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: University kinesiology laboratory. Participants: One trained researcher conducted all measurements. Procedures: The stretch force of a floss band was measured at 6 different elongation lengths with a force gauge. Main Outcome Measures: Band tension force at different band elongation lengths. Results: The stretch force values for the 5.08-cm width (2 in) were as follows: 25% = 13.53 (0.25) N, 50% = 24.57 (0.28) N, 75% = 36.18 (0.39) N, 100% = 45.89 (0.62) N, 125% = 54.68 (0.26) N, and 150% = 62.54 (0.40) N. The stretch force values for the 10.16-cm width (4 in) were as follows: 25% = 16.70 (0.35) N, 50% = 31.90 (0.52) N, 75% = 47.45 (0.44) N, 100% = 57.75 (0.24) N, 125% = 69.02 (0.28) N, and 150% = 81.10 (0.67) N. Both bandwidths demonstrated a linear increase in stretch force as the bands became longer. Conclusion: These values may help professionals to understand and document the tension force being applied at different lengths to produce a more beneficial application during treatment. Future research should determine how the different length/tensions effect the local myofascia, arterial, and vascular systems.

Open access

Scott W. Cheatham and Russell Baker

Context: Kinesiology tape (KT) is a therapeutic intervention used to treat different musculoskeletal conditions and to enhance sports performance. The evidence is inconclusive, with researchers attributing the variable outcomes to different manufactured KT used in the research. Researchers have begun to measure and document the mechanical properties of different brands, using machines versus professionals. This prevents a clear translation to clinical practice, as it may be difficult to reproduce outcomes. There is a need to measure the mechanical properties of KT using more clinically relevant methodology. Objective: The purpose was to document a clinically relevant method of measuring the mechanical properties of 2 different types of precut RockTape® tape at common elongation lengths and to establish the methodology for future validation research on this testing method. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: University laboratory. Participants: One researcher conducted all measurements. Procedures: Each tape was measured at 3 elongation lengths with a force gauge. Main Outcome Measures: Force, stress, and Young modulus. Results: The RockTape® 2 and RockTape® 3 elongation force were 25% = 2.27 (0.21) and 2.12 (0.26) N, 50% = 6.51 (0.27) and 5.93 (0.20) N, and 75% = 30.13 (0.63) and 21.23 (0.41) N. The stress values for the RockTape® 2 and RockTape® 3 were 25% = 0.88 (0.05) and 0.82 (0.03) kPa, 50% = 2.52 (0.03) and 2.29 (0.01) kPa, and 75% = 11.67 (0.04) and 8.23 (0.02) kPa. The Young modulus values for the RockTape® 2 and RockTape® 3 were 25% = 3.51 (0.00) and 3.29 (0.00) kPa, 50% = 5.04 (0.00) and 4.60 (0.00) kPa, and 75% = 15.57 (0.00) and 10.96 (0.00) kPa. Conclusion: This investigation documented a novel method of measuring the mechanical properties of 2 types of RockTape® KT. Future research should attempt to validate these testing methods.

Open access

Scott W. Cheatham, Kyle R. Stull, Mike Fantigrassi, and Ian Montel

Context: The squat is a fundamental movement for weightlifting and sports performance. Both unilateral and bilateral squats are also used to assess transitional and dynamic lower-extremity control. Common lower-extremity conditions can have an influence on squat performance. Of interest are the effects of hip musculoskeletal conditions and associated factors, such as hip muscle pain, fatigue, and tightness, on squat performance. Currently, there has been no appraisal of the evidence regarding the association of these conditions and associated factors on squat performance. Objective: This study evaluated the current evidence regarding common hip musculoskeletal conditions and associated factors, such as hip muscle pain, fatigue, and tightness, on squat performance. Evidence Acquisition: A systematic review was conducted according to preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines. A search of PubMed, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, ProQuest, and Google Scholar® was conducted in October, 2016 using the following keywords alone and in combination: hip, joint, arthritis, pain, range of motion (ROM), fatigue, tightness, pathology, condition, muscle, intraarticular, extraarticular, femoroacetabular impingement, single leg, bilateral, squat, performance, and technique. The grading of studies was conducted using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale. Evidence Synthesis: The authors identified 35 citations, 15 of which met the inclusion criteria. The qualifying studies yielded a total of 542 subjects (160 men and 382 women; mean age = 29.3 (5.9) y) and measured performance with either the barbell squat, step down, bilateral, or single-leg squat. Femoroacetabular impingement and hip arthroscopy were the only hip conditions found that affected the squat. Associated factors, such as muscle pain, fatigue, and tightness, also influenced squat performance. Conclusion: This review found that common hip conditions and associated factors and their effects on squat performance to be underinvestigated. Future research should focus on the association between common hip conditions and squat performance.