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Blanca Roman-Viñas, Fabio Zazo, Jesús Martínez-Martínez, Susana Aznar-Laín and Lluís Serra-Majem

Introduction Trend data from the Spanish National Health Survey shows that the proportion of children who are physically active (some kind of leisure time physical activity at least several times per month) range from 45% in 1993 to 59% in 1997 and 56% in 2011. 1 Data collected for the 2016 Report

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Taru Manyanga, Nyaradzai E. Munambah, Carol B. Mahachi, Daga Makaza, Tholumusa F. Mlalazi, Vincent Masocha, Paul Makoni, Fortunate Sithole, Bhekuzulu Khumalo, Sipho H. Rutsate and Tonderayi M. Matsungo

involving 49 countries. This paper summarizes results of Zimbabwe’s 2018 Report Card on the physical activity and nutritional status among 5-17 year old children and youth. Methods The 2018 Report Card summarizes data for 10 core physical activity indicators, common to the Global Matrix 3.0 (Overall

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Jasmin Bhawra, Priyanka Chopra, Ranjani Harish, Anjana Mohan, Krishnaveni V. Ghattu, Kumaran Kalyanaraman and Tarun R. Katapally

Introduction Research demonstrates that almost half of children and youth in India do not meet recommended guidelines for physical activity and sedentary behaviour. 1 The 2016 India Report Card identified several gaps in evidence, including nationally representative data on active living and

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Lowri C. Edwards, Richard Tyler, Dylan Blain, Anna Bryant, Neil Canham, Lauren Carter-Davies, Cain Clark, Tim Evans, Ceri Greenall, Julie Hobday, Anwen Jones, Marianne Mannello, Emily Marchant, Maggie Miller, Graham Moore, Kelly Morgan, Sarah Nicholls, Chris Roberts, Michael Sheldrick, Karen Thompson, Nalda Wainwright, Malcolm Ward, Simon Williams and Gareth Stratton

Introduction This is the third Active Healthy Kids Wales (AHK-Wales) Report Card following the inaugural and second report card published in 2014 and 2016 respectively. 1 , 2 The 2018 report card (Figure  1 ) consolidates and translates research related to physical activity among children and

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Diego Augusto Santos Silva, Diego Giulliano Destro Christofaro, Gerson Luis de Moraes Ferrari, Kelly Samara da Silva, Nelson Nardo, Roberto Jerônimo dos Santos Silva, Rômulo Araújo Fernandes and Valter Cordeiro Barbosa Filho

Introduction The practice of regular physical activity in children and adolescents is important for better health and development throughout the life course. 1 Nonetheless, data from Brazil’s 2016 Report Card revealed that only 40% of children and youth (6-19 years old) met the recommendations for

Open access

Peter T. Katzmarzyk, Kara D. Denstel, Kim Beals, Jordan Carlson, Scott E. Crouter, Thomas L. McKenzie, Russell R. Pate, Susan B. Sisson, Amanda E. Staiano, Heidi Stanish, Dianne S. Ward, Melicia Whitt-Glover and Carly Wright

Introduction The purpose of this paper is to summarize the results of the 2018 United States (U.S.) Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth (Figure  1 ), which provides a comprehensive evaluation of physical activity levels and factors influencing physical activity among children

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Ricky Camplain, Julie A. Baldwin, Meghan Warren, Carolyn Camplain, Monica R. Lininger and Robert T. Trotter

Every year, approximately 12 million Americans cycle in and out of jail (ie, short-term facilities that hold individuals awaiting trial and/or sentenced to a term of less than 1 y). 1 Although jails allow incarcerated individuals’ recreation time to engage in physical activity, 2 it is not clear

Open access

Stewart G. Trost, Christopher C. Drovandi and Karin Pfeiffer

Background:

Published energy cost data for children and adolescents are lacking. The purpose of this study was to measure and describe developmental trends in the energy cost of 12 physical activities commonly performed by youth.

Methods:

A mixed age cohort of 209 participants completed 12 standardized activity trials on 4 occasions over a 3-year period (baseline, 12-months, 24-months, and 36-months) while wearing a portable indirect calorimeter. Bayesian hierarchical regression was used to link growth curves from each age cohort into a single curve describing developmental trends in energy cost from age 6 to 18 years.

Results:

For sedentary and light-intensity household chores, YOUTH METs (METy) remained stable or declined with age. In contrast, METy values associated with brisk walking, running, basketball, and dance increased with age.

Conclusions:

The reported energy costs for specific activities will contribute to efforts to update and expand the youth compendium.

Open access

Reginald Ocansey, Richmond Aryeetey, Seidu Sofo, Alex Nazzar, Margaret Delali, Prince Pambo, Vida Nyawornota, John Nartey and Rachel Sarkwa

Background:

Currently, there is limited evidence on estimates for physical activity (PA) behavior and sedentary behavior (SB) in Ghana. This report card (RC) is intended to increase awareness and sensitivity about issues surrounding PA and SB in Ghana.

Methods:

Data were collected from peer-reviewed literature, graduate students’ theses, physical education and sports documents, and a survey of opinions of stakeholders covering the 10 key RC indicators and benchmarks. The principal investigator harmonized all grades. A consensus meeting of the RC team was held to assign the final grades.

Results:

School and Community grades declined from a D in 2014 to an F in 2016. SB declined from B to D. Family and Active Play were not graded in 2014 and now received an F and a B, respectively. Family and Built Environment were graded F, Active Transportation received a C, and Government and Overall PA were graded D.

Conclusions:

A conscious national investment effort can increase overall PA among children.

Open access

Jan Seghers, Stijn De Baere, Maïté Verloigne and Greet Cardon

Introduction Despite the many health benefits associated with physical activity (PA) throughout childhood, the majority of children and adolescents in Flanders, the northern Dutch-speaking part of Belgium, do not meet the current guideline of 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) per day. 1