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Vedrana Sember, Shawnda A. Morrison, Gregor Jurak, Marjeta Kovač, Mojca Golobič, Poljanka Pavletić Samardžija, Mojca Gabrijelčič, Marko Primožič, Tjaša Kotar, Janet Klara Djomba and Gregor Starc

Introduction Slovenian national surveillance data on physical fitness of children and youth (SLOfit) 1 show that after almost two decades of decline, the trends of physical fitness started improving after 2010, providing indirect evidence that declining trends of physical activity have been

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Chia-Yuan Yu and Biyuan Wang

Public transportation has identified as the means of integrating transit-related physical activity into regular life. 1 Instead of providing point-to-point travel service, taking public transit requires users to take the trip to the transit station and the trip to the destination. 2 , 3 Therefore

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Reginald Ocansey, Richmond Aryeetey, Seidu Sofo, Alex Nazzar, Margaret Delali, Prince Pambo, Vida Nyawornota, John Nartey and Rachel Sarkwa

Background:

Currently, there is limited evidence on estimates for physical activity (PA) behavior and sedentary behavior (SB) in Ghana. This report card (RC) is intended to increase awareness and sensitivity about issues surrounding PA and SB in Ghana.

Methods:

Data were collected from peer-reviewed literature, graduate students’ theses, physical education and sports documents, and a survey of opinions of stakeholders covering the 10 key RC indicators and benchmarks. The principal investigator harmonized all grades. A consensus meeting of the RC team was held to assign the final grades.

Results:

School and Community grades declined from a D in 2014 to an F in 2016. SB declined from B to D. Family and Active Play were not graded in 2014 and now received an F and a B, respectively. Family and Built Environment were graded F, Active Transportation received a C, and Government and Overall PA were graded D.

Conclusions:

A conscious national investment effort can increase overall PA among children.

Open access

Stewart G. Trost, Christopher C. Drovandi and Karin Pfeiffer

Background:

Published energy cost data for children and adolescents are lacking. The purpose of this study was to measure and describe developmental trends in the energy cost of 12 physical activities commonly performed by youth.

Methods:

A mixed age cohort of 209 participants completed 12 standardized activity trials on 4 occasions over a 3-year period (baseline, 12-months, 24-months, and 36-months) while wearing a portable indirect calorimeter. Bayesian hierarchical regression was used to link growth curves from each age cohort into a single curve describing developmental trends in energy cost from age 6 to 18 years.

Results:

For sedentary and light-intensity household chores, YOUTH METs (METy) remained stable or declined with age. In contrast, METy values associated with brisk walking, running, basketball, and dance increased with age.

Conclusions:

The reported energy costs for specific activities will contribute to efforts to update and expand the youth compendium.

Open access

Jung-Woo Oh, JungJun Lim, Sang-Hwa Lee, Yu-sun Jin, Bumjo Oh, Chung Gun Lee, Deok Hwan Lee, Eun-Young Lee, Han Joo Lee, Hyon Park, Hyun Joo Kang, Justin Y. Jeon, Mi-Seong Yu, Sang-Hoon Suh, SeJung Park, So Jung Lee, Soo Jung Park, Wook Song, Yewon Yu, Yoonkyung Song, Youngwon Kim and Yeon Soo Kim

Introduction In an effort to join the global movement to promote physical activity among young people, South Korea developed its first Report Card (RC) on Physical Activity for Children and Youth in 2016 as part of the Global Matrix 2.0. 1 The 2018 South Korea RC has been developed as part of the

Open access

Geoffrey M. Hudson and Kyle Sprow

Physical activity is important for prevention and management of numerous chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. 1 – 3 People with higher levels of physical activity have lower all-cause mortality, improved immune function, and better recovery from upper respiratory

Open access

Susana Andrade, Angélica Ochoa-Avilés, Wilma Freire, Natalia Romero-Sandoval, Daniel Orellana, Teodoro Contreras, José Luis Pillco, Jessica Sacta, Diana Andrade Muñoz, Patricia Ramírez, Miguel Martin and Silvana Donoso

Introduction International initiatives like the Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance (AHKGA) have emerged to support monitoring and surveillance of physical activity, physical fitness, sedentary behavior and its social and environmental influences among children and adolescents. 1 , 2 The

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Jorge Mota, Rute Santos, Manuel João Coelho-e-Silva, Armando M. Raimundo and Luís B. Sardinha

Introduction In 2016 we presented the first Portuguese Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth, based on available data from 2010 to 2016. Meantime, new data has emerged and there is a need to update the evidence. Therefore, the current report aims at describing the main results of

Open access

Arunas Emeljanovas, Brigita Mieziene, Rita Gruodyte-Raciene, Saulius Sukys, Renata Rutkauskaite, Laima Trinkuniene, Natalija Fatkulina and Inga Gerulskiene

Introduction Research reveals worsening trends for physical activity (PA) and physical fitness in Lithuanian school-aged children. 1 , 2 Lithuanian youth are among the least active in the context of other European countries. 1 School-aged children’s physical fitness is constantly declining, with

Open access

Chiaki Tanaka, Shigeho Tanaka, Shigeru Inoue, Motohiko Miyachi, Koya Suzuki, Takafumi Abe and John J. Reilly

Introduction In 2015, the Japan Sports Agency (JSA) was established to advance policies such as promoting regional sports, school physical education; promoting the Olympic and Paralympic movement. 1 The momentum to promote physical activity (PA) by various agencies, including the JSA is increasing