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Genevieve F. Dunton, Yue Liao, Stephen Intille, Jennifer Wolch and Mary Ann Pentz

Background:

This study used real-time electronic surveys delivered through mobile phones, known as Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA), to determine whether level and experience of leisure-time physical activity differ across children’s physical and social contexts.

Methods:

Children (N = 121; ages 9 to 13 years; 52% male, 32% Hispanic/Latino) participated in 4 days (Fri.–Mon.) of EMA during nonschool time. Electronic surveys (20 total) assessed primary activity (eg, active play/sports/exercise), physical location (eg, home, outdoors), social context (eg, friends, alone), current mood (positive and negative affect), and enjoyment. Responses were time-matched to the number of steps and minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA; measured by accelerometer) in the 30 minutes before each survey.

Results:

Mean steps and MVPA were greater outdoors than at home or at someone else’s house (all P < .05). Steps were greater with multiple categories of company (eg, friends and family together) than with family members only or alone (all P < .05). Enjoyment was greater outdoors than at home or someone else’s house (all P < .05). Negative affect was greater when alone and with family only than friends only (all P < .05).

Conclusion:

Results describing the value of outdoor and social settings could inform context-specific interventions in this age group.

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Kenneth E. Powell, Abby C. King, David M. Buchner, Wayne W. Campbell, Loretta DiPietro, Kirk I. Erickson, Charles H. Hillman, John M. Jakicic, Kathleen F. Janz, Peter T. Katzmarzyk, William E. Kraus, Richard F. Macko, David X. Marquez, Anne McTiernan, Russell R. Pate, Linda S. Pescatello and Melicia C. Whitt-Glover

Regular physical activity is associated with a wide range of health benefits. 1 Unfortunately, only about 20% of adults and high school aged youth meet the current federal guidelines for both aerobic and muscle-strengthening physical activity. 2 In 2016, the US Department of Health and Human

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Kelly R. Evenson, Fang Wen, Sarah M. Lee, Katie M. Heinrich and Amy Eyler

Background:

A Healthy People 2010 developmental objective (22-12) was set to increase the proportion of the nation's public and private schools that provide access to their physical activity spaces and facilities for all persons outside of normal school hours. The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence of indoor and outdoor facilities at schools and the availability of those facilities to the public in 2000 and 2006.

Methods:

In 2000 and 2006, the School Health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) was conducted in each state and in randomly selected districts, schools, and classrooms. This analysis focused on the school level questionnaire from a nationally representative sample of public and nonpublic elementary, middle, and high schools (n = 921 in 2000 and n = 984 in 2006).

Results:

No meaningful changes in the prevalence of access to school physical activity facilities were found from 2000 to 2006, for youth or adult community sports teams, classes, or open gym.

Conclusions:

These national data indicate a lack of progress from 2000 and 2006 toward increasing the proportion of the nation's public and private schools that provide access to their physical activity facilities for all persons outside of normal school hours.

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Levi Frehlich, Christine Friedenreich, Alberto Nettel-Aguirre, Jasper Schipperijn and Gavin R. McCormack

Evidence regarding the role of neighborhood built characteristics in supporting physical activity continues to accumulate ( Barnett et al., 2017 ; Wasfi, Steinmetz-Wood, & Kestens, 2017 ) and inform urban planning and policy ( Calise, Heeren, DeJong, Dumith, & Kohl, 2013 ; Kärmeniemi, Lankila

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Paul J. Collings, Diane Farrar, Joanna Gibson, Jane West, Sally E. Barber and John Wright

Physical activity confers myriad benefits to the uncomplicated pregnancy, 1 benefits that can have long-term health impacts for the developing fetus. 2 , 3 Our understanding that intrauterine environments can program susceptibility to future disease has developed over the last 2 decades. 4 This

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Nisha Botchwey, Myron F. Floyd, Keshia Pollack Porter, Carmen L. Cutter, Chad Spoon, Tom L. Schmid, Terry L. Conway, J. Aaron Hipp, Anna J. Kim, M. Renee Umstattd Meyer, Amanda L. Walker, Tina J. Kauh and Jim F. Sallis

risk. 1 , 2 The same populations often have limited access to safe places and quality programs for physical activity (PA). 3 To help ensure that children grow up at a healthy weight, daily or regular PA is recommended. 4 Improvements in PA environments in neighborhood settings, where children

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Amy R. Barchek, Shelby E. Baez, Matthew C. Hoch and Johanna M. Hoch

Clinical Scenario According to the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association, it is recommended that adults aged 18–65 years should spend a minimum of 30 minutes per day for 5 days each week participating in moderate physical activity or 20 minutes per day for 2 days

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Maureen R. Weiss

I have always taken a developmental perspective in my scholarly work on youth motivation and physical activity, so I am pleased with the opportunity to highlight the benefits of integrating knowledge from motor development and sport psychology. Integrating theories and research can lead to a fuller

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Jessica St Aubin, Jennifer Volberding and Jack Duffy

associated with faster full return to sport and school/work. ▸ There is moderate evidence to support the incorporation of light to moderate physical activity within 7 days after a concussion in order to decrease recovery time and symptoms. Clinical Scenario Concussions are a growing epidemic and these

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Matthew Pearce, Tom R.P. Bishop, Stephen Sharp, Kate Westgate, Michelle Venables, Nicholas J. Wareham and Søren Brage

is conversion to the level of the least detailed information, for example transformation of continuous data to a binary categorization of low vs. high physical activity level ( Kilpelainen et al., 2011 ). However, this approach loses the resolution of the more detailed data, and may therefore limit