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Yolanda Demetriou, Antje Hebestreit, Anne K. Reimers, Annegret Schlund, Claudia Niessner, Steffen Schmidt, Jonas David Finger, Michael Mutz, Klaus Völker, Lutz Vogt, Alexander Woll and Jens Bucksch

Introduction Even though positive health effects of regular physical activity (PA) are well known, 1 , 2 national and international surveillance data show that PA is the “pill not taken”. This leads to widespread negative health and economic consequences. The 2018 German Report Card on Physical

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Marilia Silva Paulo, Javaid Nauman, Abdishakur Abdulle, Abdulla Aljunaibi, Mouza Alzaabi, Caroline Barakat-Haddad, Mohamud Sheek-Hussein, Syed Mahboob Shah, Susan Yousufzai and Tom Loney

to a modern urbanised, indoor, and technology-driven lifestyle. 1 Limited national surveillance from the last 10 years shows that only ∼20% of UAE children accumulate the recommended amount of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity 2 (MVPA; ≥60 minutes per day). 3 , 4 Both Emirati and

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Izzeldin Ibrahim, Eiman Al Hammadi, Suzan Sayegh, Lena Zimmo, Jwaher Al Neama, Husam Rezeq, Abdulla Saeed Al-Mohannadi and Al Anoud Al-Thani

physical activity (PA) among children and youth (Figure  1 ). It provides an evaluation of the current status and progress of behaviours and influencing factors. This Report Card has created novel surveillance opportunities to understand PA trends over time and serve as a recommendations platform for

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Nicolas Aguilar-Farias, Sebastian Miranda-Marquez, Kabir P. Sadarangani, Pia Martino-Fuentealba, Carlos Cristi-Montero, Jaime Carcamo-Oyarzun, Pedro Delgado-Floody, Damian Chandia-Poblete, Camila Mella-Garcia, Fernando Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Astrid Von Oetinger, Teresa Balboa-Castillo, Sebastian Peña, Cristobal Cuadrado, Paula Bedregal, Carlos Celis-Morales, Antonio García-Hermoso and Andrea Cortinez-O’Ryan

Introduction Chile’s first Report Card (RC) on Physical Activity for Children and Youth released in 2016 graded with an F overall physical activity (PA), as only 3 out of 10 children and 2 out of 10 youth performed at least 60 minutes of moderate-to vigorous-intensity PA per day. 1 Most indicators

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Dawn M. Tladi, Malebogo Monnaatsie, Sheila Shaibu, Gaonyadiwe Sinombe, Gaonyadiwe G. Mokone, Lesego Gabaitiri, Leapetswe Malete and Hubona Omphile

Introduction Physical inactivity is now the fourth leading risk factor of mortality globally. 1 However, very little is known about physical activity (PA) among school-aged Botswana children. Physical education (PE) in Botswana public schools is offered as an optional subject 2 and thus many

Open access

John J. Reilly, Avril Johnstone, Geraldine McNeill and Adrienne R. Hughes

Background:

The 2016 Active Healthy Kids Scotland Report Card aims to improve surveillance of physical activity (PA), facilitate international comparisons, and encourage evidence-informed PA and health policy.

Methods:

Active Healthy Kids Canada Report Card methodology was used: a search for data on child and adolescent PA and health published after the 2013 Scottish Report Card was carried out. Data sources were considered for grading if based on representative samples with prevalence estimates made using methods with low bias. Ten health behaviors/outcomes were graded on an A to F scale based on quintiles (prevalence meeting recommendations ≥80% graded A down to <20% graded F).

Results:

Three of the seven Health Behaviors and Outcomes received F or F- grades: Overall PA, Sedentary Behavior, and Obesity. Active and Outdoor Play and Organized Sport Participation could not be graded. Active Commuting to School was graded C, and Diet was graded D-. Family and Peer Influence was graded D-; Perceived Safety and Availability of Space for PA as well as the National Policy Environment were more favorable (both B).

Conclusions:

Grades were identical to those in 2013. Scotland has a generally favorable environment for PA, but children and adolescents have low PA and high sedentary behavior. Gaps in surveillance included lack of objectively measured PA, no surveillance of moderate-to-vigorous PA in children, summary surveillance data not expressed in ways which match recommendations (eg, for PA in young children; for screen-time), and no surveillance of Sport Participation, Active and Outdoor Play, or Sitting. Scottish policy does not include sedentary behavior at present.

Open access

Asaduzzaman Khan, Mohammad Abdul Kadir, Sohel Reza Choudhury, Fatema Ashraf, Mahbubur Rahman, Kazi Rumana Ahmed, K. M. Saif-Ur-Rahman, Sonia Parvin and Riaz Uddin

Introduction Insufficient physical activity (PA) among children and youth is a global public health challenge. 1 Available data suggests that a large proportion of Bangladeshi youth do not meet the recommendations of ≥60 min/day of moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) guidelines. 2 This is of

Open access

Evelin Mäestu, Merike Kull, Kerli Mooses, Jarek Mäestu, Maret Pihu, Andre Koka, Lennart Raudsepp and Jaak Jürimäe

Introduction Recent data shows that only a small proportion of Estonian children and youth accumulate the recommended amount of daily moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (PA) (MVPA; ≥60 minutes). 1 – 3 The purpose of this paper is to summarize the results of the 2018 PA Report Card

Open access

Natasha Schranz, Vanessa Glennon, John Evans, Sjaan Gomersall, Louise Hardy, Kylie D. Hesketh, David Lubans, Nicola D. Ridgers, Leon Straker, Michalis Stylianou, Grant R. Tomkinson, Stewart Vella, Jenny Ziviani and Tim Olds

Introduction A decades worth of high quality surveillance sources have consistently shown that Australian kids are not meeting the physical activity (PA) guidelines of at least 60 min moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) each day of the week. 1 This is concerning because physical inactivity is

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Jennifer Dill and Deborah Howe

Background:

Research has established that built environments, including street networks, bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure, and land uses, can positively affect the frequency and duration of daily physical activity. Attention is now being given to policy frameworks such as zoning codes that set the standards and expectations for this built environment.

Methods:

We examined the adoption and implementation of mixed-use and related zoning provisions with specific attention to the role that physical activity serves as a motivation for such policies and to what extent public health agencies influence the adoption process. A sample of planning directors from 53 communities with outstanding examples of mixed-use developments and 145 randomly selected midsized communities were surveyed.

Results:

Physical activity is not a dominant motivator in master plans and/or zoning codes and public health agencies played minor roles in policy adoption. However, physical activity as a motivation appears to be increasing in recent years and is associated with higher levels of policy innovation.

Conclusions:

Recommendations include framing the importance of physical activity in terms of other dominant concerns such as livability, dynamic centers, and economic development. Health agencies are encouraged to work in coalitions to focus arguments on behalf of physical activity.