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Peter Peeling, Martyn J. Binnie, Paul S.R. Goods, Marc Sim and Louise M. Burke

popular supplement initially found to improve oxygen uptake (VO 2 ) kinetics during prolonged submaximal exercise ( Bailey et al., 2009 ). The ingestion of dietary NO 3 – leads to an enhanced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability via the NO 3 – -nitrite-NO pathway, a reduction catalyzed initially by bacteria

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Philo U. Saunders, Laura A. Garvican-Lewis, Robert F. Chapman and Julien D. Périard

cardiovascular strain that decreases maximal aerobic capacity (VO 2 max; Ely et al., 2010 ; Périard & Racinais, 2015 ; Périard et al., 2011 ) and a potential hyperthermia-induced reduction in voluntary drive (i.e., motivation; Febbraio et al., 1994 , 1996 ). Heat stress exercise also leads to a greater

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Katariina Kämppi, Annaleena Aira, Nina Halme, Pauliina Husu, Virpi Inkinen, Laura Joensuu, Sami Kokko, Kaarlo Laine, Kaisu Mononen, Sanna Palomäki, Timo Ståhl, Arja Sääkslahti and Tuija Tammelin

) on at least 5 days per week 25% of 9-15 y (LIITU survey 2016). 1 Physical Fitness C Average percentile achieved: BOYS C- (44% of 11 and 14 y, 46% of 11 y, 41% of 14 y), GIRLS C+ (59% of 11 and 14 y, 49% of 11 y, 69% of 14 y) reached by using VO2peak (Median values used instead of mean values

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Martyn Standage, Lauren Sherar, Thomas Curran, Hannah J. Wilkie, Russell Jago, Adrian Davis and Charlie Foster

data which show 62% of children to engage in such behavior (aged 11, 13, 15 years).  ▪ INC for England Report Card  ▪ D+ for the Global Matrix (ie, based on Canadian Guidelines) Physical Fitness C- For VO 2 peak, the data aligned with a grade of D+ (Boys 10–14 yrs = 38%; Girls 10–14 yrs = 36%) 9

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Flávia Cavalcante Monteiro Melo, Kátia Kamila Félix de Lima, Ana Paula Knackfuss Freitas Silveira, Kesley Pablo Morais de Azevedo, Isis Kelly dos Santos, Humberto Jefferson de Medeiros, José Carlos Leitão and Maria Irany Knackfuss

respiratory infections. Thus, the results obtained in the Jacobs 12 studies showed that there was an average peak VO 2 elevation of 29.7% and, according to the author, showed that this result could have occurred in part due to the different levels of control of the upper body acquired during training. In

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Kayla E. Boehm and Kevin C. Miller

 km in the Falmouth Road race in August (23.3°C [2.5°C], 70% [16%] humidity). – Race participants were included as subjects if T rec  ≥ 40°C and an EHS diagnosis was documented. Quasi-experimental study. – Subjects ran on a treadmill at 65% VO 2 max in heat (40.0°C, ∼18% humidity) until T rec

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Kathryn L. Weston, Nicoleta Pasecinic and Laura Basterfield

to receive and utilize oxygen for energy production during exercise ( 4 )—is a strong summative marker of physical health ( 30 ); with peak oxygen uptake (VO 2 peak)—the highest rate at which oxygen can be consumed during exercise ( 4 )—widely recognized as the best single measure of aerobic fitness

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Neil Armstrong and Jo Welsman

Centered on mean age 12.8 years. b FFM computed from the equations of Slaughter et al. ( 37 ). It is well documented that age-related increases in youth peak V ˙ O 2 are the result of increases in maximal stroke volume (SV max ) and maximal arteriovenous oxygen difference (a-vO 2 diff max). The reasons

Open access

. Methods.— Twenty five trail runners (mean age 31.2 ±5.1 years) completed a standard graded exercise test on the treadmill for determination of maximal oxygen uptake (VO 2 max 59.5±5.2 ml·kg -1. min -1 ) and LT. Values and velocities for aerobic LT (AET), individual anaerobic LT (IAT according to Dickhuth

Open access

Ben Desbrow, Nicholas A. Burd, Mark Tarnopolsky, Daniel R. Moore and Kirsty J. Elliott-Sale

, 2003 ). This decline in VO 2 peak may be related to both central (maximal heart rate and stroke volume) and peripheral (arteriovenous oxygen difference) factors. One of the most common findings in endurance athletes is an age-related reduction in maximal heart rate of ∼3% to 5% per decade ( Hawkins