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Ricardo J.S. Costa, Beat Knechtle, Mark Tarnopolsky, and Martin D. Hoffman

support for shorter running events and ultramarathon training, caution is warranted in using these guidelines for ultramarathon competition due to the large diversity of participant demographics and event characteristics. It is clear that individual assessment to determine daily and event nutrition and

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Salomé Aubert, Joel D. Barnes, Chalchisa Abdeta, Patrick Abi Nader, Ade F. Adeniyi, Nicolas Aguilar-Farias, Dolores S. Andrade Tenesaca, Jasmin Bhawra, Javier Brazo-Sayavera, Greet Cardon, Chen-Kang Chang, Christine Delisle Nyström, Yolanda Demetriou, Catherine E. Draper, Lowri Edwards, Arunas Emeljanovas, Aleš Gába, Karla I. Galaviz, Silvia A. González, Marianella Herrera-Cuenca, Wendy Y. Huang, Izzeldin A.E. Ibrahim, Jaak Jürimäe, Katariina Kämppi, Tarun R. Katapally, Piyawat Katewongsa, Peter T. Katzmarzyk, Asaduzzaman Khan, Agata Korcz, Yeon Soo Kim, Estelle Lambert, Eun-Young Lee, Marie Löf, Tom Loney, Juan López-Taylor, Yang Liu, Daga Makaza, Taru Manyanga, Bilyana Mileva, Shawnda A. Morrison, Jorge Mota, Vida K. Nyawornota, Reginald Ocansey, John J. Reilly, Blanca Roman-Viñas, Diego Augusto Santos Silva, Pairoj Saonuam, John Scriven, Jan Seghers, Natasha Schranz, Thomas Skovgaard, Melody Smith, Martyn Standage, Gregor Starc, Gareth Stratton, Narayan Subedi, Tim Takken, Tuija Tammelin, Chiaki Tanaka, David Thivel, Dawn Tladi, Richard Tyler, Riaz Uddin, Alun Williams, Stephen H.S. Wong, Ching-Lin Wu, Paweł Zembura, and Mark S. Tremblay

children at the country and community level, in different contexts and settings. Integrated Discussion Overall, the average grades obtained for each indicator were low, and a small variation was observed within the 10 indicators (“D” to “C”). More diversity was observed between the 3 HDI groupings, between

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Kelly P. Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Viviane Grassmann, Krystn Orr, Amy C. McPherson, Guy E. Faulkner, and F. Virginia Wright

The objective of this study was to comprehensively evaluate inclusive out-of-school time physical activity programs for children/youth with physical disabilities. A search of the published literature was conducted and augmented by international expertise. A quality appraisal was conducted; only studies with quality ratings ≥60% informed our best practice recommendations. Seventeen studies were included using qualitative (n = 9), quantitative (n = 5), or mixed (n = 3) designs. Programs had a diversity of age groups, group sizes, and durations. Most programs were recreational level, involving both genders. Rehabilitation staff were the most common leaders. Outcomes focused on social skills/relationships, physical skill development, and psychological well-being, with overall positive effects shown in these areas. The best practice recommendations are consistent with an abilities-based approach emphasizing common group goals and interests; cooperative activities; mastery-oriented, individualized instruction; and developmentally appropriate, challenging activities. Results indicate that inclusive out-of-school time physical activity programs are important for positive psychosocial and physical skill development of children/youth with physical disabilities.

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Lesley Steinman, Mark Doescher, David Levinger, Cynthia Perry, Louise Carter, Amy Eyler, Semra Aytur, Angie L.I. Cradock, Kelly R. Evenson, Katie Heinrich, Jacqueline Kerr, Jill Litt, Yucel Severcan, and Carolyn Voorhees

Background:

Recent research demonstrates the importance of targeting the built environment to support individual physical activity, particularly for people experiencing health disparities. Master plans to promote biking and/or pedestrians (BPMPs) are a potential method for environmental change. This descriptive study aims to provide a snapshot of plan attributes and better understand demographic, social and transportation characteristics of communities with BPMPs.

Methods:

We collected a census sample of BPMPs from 4 states. Population and commuting data were obtained from national statistics.

Results:

294 master plans were included, with most plans representing municipalities. 62% of plans targeted biking only, one-fifth targeted biking and walking, and 15% targeted walking only. The sampled locations have a similar demographic profile as the overall U.S. for median age and household income, people of color, high school education, and income inequality. The degree of racial diversity of sampled communities is slightly less than the U.S. average and the percentage of people who walk to work were slightly higher.

Conclusions:

Given that communities with master plans have a similar profile as the overall U.S., BPMPs could feasibly be spread to communities throughout the country. Further research is planned to describe BPMPs in detail toward informing future plan development.

Open access

Nancy I. Williams and Alan L. Smith

“Fireside Chat” with senior leaders in the field. In line with the diversity of AKA member units, the presentations and resulting articles demonstrate the originality, adaptability, and creativity of a range of approaches to promote physical activity through kinesiology teaching and outreach. They highlight

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Justine J. Reel

the dedicated hands of Donald Marks, PsyD, for the last 4 years; I am pleased to receive the EIC baton from him and keep JCSP on its upward trajectory. To assist with this exciting transition, new members have been added to the editorial board to enhance diversity and expand our capacity to publish

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Sarah K. Keadle, Eduardo E. Bustamante, and Matthew P. Buman

and intervention science has coincided with efforts to train a skilled, diverse workforce to help grow and implement this knowledge. Part 3: Assurance With regard to assurance, PAPH has focused on two areas: (a) training a skilled workforce and (b) diversity, equity, and inclusion. The emphasis on

Open access

David B. Pyne

US-based publisher (Human Kinetics), an English-language format, both the editorial team and editorial board predominantly from English-speaking countries, and correspondingly a large proportion of published articles from the same countries. In this era of diversity and inclusion, the issue of how to

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Carrie B. Scherzer and Justine J. Reel

losing sight of institutional history along with the importance of promoting diversity and inclusiveness in our profession. AASP has a strong tradition of being student-centered and has always carefully considered actions or policies that could negatively affect students. One of the gravest concerns

Open access

Catherine Carty, Hidde P. van der Ploeg, Stuart J.H. Biddle, Fiona Bull, Juana Willumsen, Lindsay Lee, Kaloyan Kamenov, and Karen Milton

due to indirectness. Furthermore, in recognition of the diversity across the population living with disability, the WHO Guidelines included ‘best practice statements’ to clearly direct individuals, and where relevant care givers, to tailor the recommendations to functional ability, health status, and