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MinKyoung Song, Dianna D. Carroll, Sarah M. Lee and Janet E. Fulton

Background:

The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines recommend youth participate in a variety of physical activities; however, few nationally representative studies describe the types and variety of youth activity. This study assessed the most frequently reported types and variety of activities among U.S. high school students, and examined the association between variety and meeting the 2008 Guidelines for aerobic activity (aerobic guideline).

Methods:

We analyzed data on 8628 U.S. high school students in grades 9–12 from the 2010 National Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey. Types of physical activity were assessed by identifying which activities each student reported in the past 7 days. Variety was assessed by the total number of different activities each student reported. Percentage (95% CI) of students who reported engaging in each activity was assessed. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between variety and meeting the aerobic guideline.

Results:

Walking was the most frequently reported activity among U.S. high school students. On average, students reported participating in 6 different activities. Variety was positively associated with meeting the aerobic guideline.

Conclusions:

These findings support encouraging youth to participate in many physical activities and may be useful for developing interventions that focus on the most prevalent activities.

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Kelly P. Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Viviane Grassmann, Krystn Orr, Amy C. McPherson, Guy E. Faulkner and F. Virginia Wright

Inclusion is a process that encourages individuals with a wide range of abilities to engage together in meaningful participation in an environment that fosters a sense of belongingness and autonomy ( DePauw & Doll-Tepper, 2000 ; Goodwin, 2003 ; Grenier, 2011 ). Inclusive physical activity (PA

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Lindsey Cox, Victoria Berends, James F. Sallis, Jessica Marie St. John, Betsy McNeil, Martin Gonzalez and Peggy Agron

Background:

Most youth are not meeting physical activity guidelines, and schools are a key venue for providing physical activity. School districts can provide physical activity opportunities through the adoption, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of policies. This paper reports results of a 2009 survey of California school governance leaders on the barriers and opportunities to providing school-based physical activity and strategies to promote adoption of evidence-based policies.

Methods:

California school board members (n = 339) completed an 83 item online survey about policy options, perceptions, and barriers to improving physical activity in schools.

Results:

Board members’ highest rated barriers to providing physical activity were budget concerns, limited time in a school day, and competing priorities. The key policy opportunities to increase physical activity were improving the quantity and quality of physical education, integrating physical activity throughout the school day, supporting active transportation to/from school, providing access to physical activity facilities during nonschool hours, and integrating physical activity into before/after school programs.

Conclusions:

Survey findings were used to develop policy resources and trainings for school governance leaders that provide a comprehensive approach to improving physical activity in schools.

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Jairo H. Migueles, Alex V. Rowlands, Florian Huber, Séverine Sabia and Vincent T. van Hees

Human physical activity and sleep are popular areas of research because of their important role in health outcomes ( He, Zhang, Li, Dai, & Shi, 2017 ; Lee et al., 2012 ). Physical activity and sleep have traditionally been quantified with diaries and questionnaires, but wearable sensors have

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Susan Paudel, Alice J. Owen, Stephane Heritier and Ben J. Smith

Regular physical activity (PA) has a range of health, social, and economic benefits. It reduces the risk of coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, breast and colon cancer, hypertension, and obesity. 1 PA has positive effects on mental health, especially depression and anxiety, mostly from

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Marie H. Murphy, Angela Carlin, Catherine Woods, Alan Nevill, Ciaran MacDonncha, Kyle Ferguson and Niamh Murphy

Physical activity is associated with multiple health benefits across the life course, 1 – 3 Regular activity has been shown to play a role in the primary and secondary prevention of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, and obesity. 2 In addition to these physical health

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Mohammad Sahebkar, Hamid Heidarian Miri, Pardis Noormohammadpour, Amir Tiyuri, Reza Pakzad, Nasrin Mansournia, Zahra Heidari, Mohammad Ali Mansournia and Emmanuel Stamatakis

Physical activity (PA) has well-established health benefits; low PA level is one of the most prevalent risk factors for noncommunicable disease worldwide. Regular PA has been shown to prevent cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, some cancers, hypertension, obesity, and depression; studies have

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Bindu P. Gopalan, Mary Dias, Karthika Arumugam, Reena R. D’Souza, Mathew Perumpil, Prasanna Kulkarni, Udaykumar Ranga and Anita Shet

require a multidisciplinary approach with a focus on the physical, immunological, and emotional/psychological health ( 4 , 47 ). Regular physical activity is known to improve the physical fitness and mental health status of healthy adolescents ( 8 ). Also, physical activity complementing ART interventions

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Elin Ekblom-Bak, Örjan Ekblom, Gunnar Andersson, Peter Wallin and Björn Ekblom

Despite the well-established knowledge that physical activity (PA) is important for health and longevity, the majority of the adult population does not meet current national guidelines. 1 , 2 Even if current PA level is known to have the greatest effect on health and physical performance in

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Nikita Rowley, James Steele, Matthew Wade, Robert James Copeland, Steve Mann, Gary Liguori, Elizabeth Horton and Alfonso Jimenez

What is Already Known on This Topic? • Physical activity (PA) is widely considered to be effective in the prevention, management, and treatment of many chronic health disorders, yet population PA levels are relatively low and have changed little in recent years. • Sufficient PA levels for health