Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 22 items for :

  • "African American" x
  • User-accessible content x
Clear All
Full access

Rebecca E. Lee, Scherezade K. Mama, Kristen P. McAlexander, Heather Adamus and Ashley V. Medina

Background:

In the US, public housing developments are typically located in lower socioeconomic status neighborhoods that may have poorer quality street level conditions, placing residents in neighborhoods that are less supportive for physical activity (PA). This study investigated the relationship of detailed, objectively assessed street-level pedestrian features with self-reported and measured PA in African American public housing residents.

Methods:

Every street segment (N = 2093) within an 800 m radius surrounding each housing development (N = 12) was systematically assessed using the Pedestrian Environment Data Scan (PEDS). Participants completed an interviewer administered International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) Short Form and wore a pedometer for 1 week.

Results:

Women reported significantly less vigorous (mean = 1955 vs. 2896 METs), moderate (mean = 733 vs. 1309 mets), walking (mean = 1080 vs. 1376 METs), and total (mean = 3768 vs. 5581 METs) PA on the IPAQ compared with men (all P <.05). Women took fewer pedometer steps per day (M = 3753 vs. 4589) compared with men, but this was not statistically significant. Regression analyses showed that for women, lower speed limits were associated with vigorous; higher street segment density was associated with more moderate PA; lower speed limits, fewer crossing aids, and more lanes were associated with more walking; and, fewer lanes was associated with more overall PA. For men, fewer sidewalk connections were associated with more moderate PA; lower speed limits were associated with more walking; and, lower speed limits was associated with more overall PA.

Conclusions:

Neighborhood factors influence physical activity; in particular, lower speed limits appear most commonly linked with increased physical activity in both men and women.

Full access

Elizabeth Lorenzo, Jacob Szeszulski, Michael Todd, Scherezade K. Mama and Rebecca E. Lee

In 2017, only 24% of adults in the United States met the 2008 physical activity recommendations. 1 African American and Hispanic/Latina women were less likely (13.9% and 13.8%, respectively) to have met recommendations than non-Hispanic white women (23.7%) were. Despite the many health promoting

Full access

Sara Wilcox, Melinda Forthofer, Patricia A. Sharpe and Brent Hutto

Background:

Walking interventions delivered by lay leaders have been shown to be effective. Knowing the characteristics of individuals who volunteer to be group leaders in walking programs could facilitate more efficient and effective recruitment and training.

Methods:

Walking group leaders were recruited into a community-based program and formed walking groups from existing social networks. Leaders and members completed a survey, participated in physical measurements, and wore an accelerometer. Regression models (adjusting for group clustering and covariates) tested psychosocial and behavioral differences between leaders and members.

Results:

The sample included 296 adults (86% women, 66% African American). Leaders (n = 60) were similar to members (n = 236) with respect to most sociodemographic and health characteristics, but were significantly older and more likely to report arthritis and high cholesterol (P-values < .05). Although leaders and members were similar in sedentary behavior and physical activity, leaders reported higher levels of exercise self-regulation, self-efficacy, and social support (P-values < .01). Leaders also reported greater use of outdoor trails (P = .005) and other outdoor recreation areas (P = .003) for physical activity than members.

Conclusion:

Although walking group leaders were no more active than members, leaders did display psychosocial characteristics and behaviors consistent with a greater readiness for change.

Full access

Michelle C. Kegler, Iris Alcantara, Regine Haardörfer, Alexandra Gemma, Denise Ballard and Julie Gazmararian

Background:

Physical activity levels, including walking, are lower in the southern U.S., particularly in rural areas. This study investigated the concept of rural neighborhood walkability to aid in developing tools for assessing walkability and to identify intervention targets in rural communities.

Methods:

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with physically active adults (n = 29) in rural Georgia. Mean age of participants was 55.9 years; 66% were male, 76% were white, and 24% were African American. Participants drew maps of their neighborhoods and discussed the relevance of typical domains of walkability to their decisions to exercise. Comparative analyses were conducted to identify major themes.

Results:

The majority felt the concept of neighborhood was applicable and viewed their neighborhood as small geographically (less than 0.5 square miles). Sidewalks were not viewed as essential for neighborhood-based physical activity and typical destinations for walking were largely absent. Destinations within walking distance included neighbors’ homes and bodies of water. Views were mixed on whether shade, safety, dogs, and aesthetics affected decisions to exercise in their neighborhoods.

Conclusions:

Measures of neighborhood walkability in rural areas should acknowledge the small size of self-defined neighborhoods, that walking in rural areas is likely for leisure time exercise, and that some domains may not be relevant.

Open access

Miranda Brunett and René Revis Shingles

spoke Spanish, and 93.3% had some CC training 417 patients who speak Hebrew (56.4% women, 38.1% men, and 5.5% unknown) and 90 physicians (27.8% women, 71.1% men, and 1.1% unknown) in outpatient clinic in Israel 26 PCPs (mean age = 43.6 y, 42% white, 27% African American 31% other, and 65% female) from

Open access

Peter T. Katzmarzyk, Kara D. Denstel, Kim Beals, Jordan Carlson, Scott E. Crouter, Thomas L. McKenzie, Russell R. Pate, Susan B. Sisson, Amanda E. Staiano, Heidi Stanish, Dianne S. Ward, Melicia Whitt-Glover and Carly Wright

time per day (2015-16 NHANES). There are significant race/ethnicity differences in reported screen time: 35%, 32%, 30%, and 25% of White, Hispanic/Mexican American, Asian, and African American children aged 6-19 years met screen time guidelines, respectively (2015-16 NHANES). Younger children aged 6

Full access

Chia-Yuan Yu and Biyuan Wang

, 5 , 10 , 18 such as race (European American, African American, Asian, Hispanic, and other); gender; age; education level (less than high school, high school, undergraduate, and graduate); household income (<$15,000, $15,000–$34,999, $35,000–$74,999, and >$75,000); population density in residence

Full access

Nisha Botchwey, Myron F. Floyd, Keshia Pollack Porter, Carmen L. Cutter, Chad Spoon, Tom L. Schmid, Terry L. Conway, J. Aaron Hipp, Anna J. Kim, M. Renee Umstattd Meyer, Amanda L. Walker, Tina J. Kauh and Jim F. Sallis

In the United States, nearly 1 in 3 young people is overweight or obese. Lower-income toddlers, children, and adolescents in historically underserved populations—African American, American Indian, Latino-Hispanic, and subpopulations of Asian Americans and Pacific Islander cultures—are at highest

Open access

Steven Loy

physical inactivity threatens to overwhelm us. Because we offer our program in the morning after school begins, we reach the very group that is seen as at a higher risk for obesity, African American and Hispanic females, who can also have great influence on childhood obesity through role modeling and

Open access

Juliessa M. Pavon, Richard J. Sloane, Carl F. Pieper, Cathleen S. Colón-Emeric, David Gallagher, Harvey J. Cohen, Katherine S. Hall, Miriam C. Morey, Midori McCarty, Thomas L. Ortel and Susan N. Hastings

.0  Male 28 (43)  African American 13 (20) Hospital characteristics  Length of stay (days), median (IQR) 4 (2, 7)  Resident medicine care team 43 (66) Accelerometer mobility data  Total time in activity (hr/day), median (IQR), range (0.08–4.8) 1.1 (0.7, 1.7)  Total time sedentary (hr/day), median (IQR