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Amy R. Barchek, Shelby E. Baez, Matthew C. Hoch and Johanna M. Hoch

physical activity have been used to determine physical activity levels in patients with a history of musculoskeletal injury. These findings are pertinent to patient care, as an understanding of how these injuries may affect a person’s physical activity can help clinicians educate their patients on the

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Nicholas A. Koemel, Christina M. Sciarrillo, Katherine B. Bode, Madison D. Dixon, Edralin A. Lucas, Nathaniel D.M. Jenkins and Sam R. Emerson

). Age and physical activity are critical modifiers of PPL ( Freese et al., 2014 ; Jackson et al., 2012 ), although most previous studies have investigated their effects separately. In a recent cross-sectional study by Emerson et al. ( 2018 ), the impact of both physical activity level and age on PPL

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Nicole K. Nathan, Rachel L. Sutherland, Kirsty Hope, Nicole J. McCarthy, Matthew Pettett, Ben Elton, Rebecca Jackson, Stewart G. Trost, Christophe Lecathelinais, Kathryn Reilly, John H. Wiggers, Alix Hall, Karen Gillham, Vanessa Herrmann and Luke Wolfenden

Francisco, the criterion of 100 minutes of PE per week for elementary students was recorded in only 20% of teachers’ schedules and occurred in only one of 20 school observations. 11 With such poor policy implementation, the potential impact that these policies may have on children’s activity levels, if

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Erin Strutz, Raymond Browning, Stephanie Smith, Barbara Lohse and Leslie Cunningham-Sabo

–vigorous PA (MVPA) and adults to accumulate 30 minutes of MVPA on most days of the week; however, existing estimates of children’s activity levels suggest that only 42% of children aged 6–11 years and only 5% of adults actually achieve these daily goals. 3 – 5 Given the lack of participation in regular PA

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Felipe Fossati Reichert, Jonathan Charles Kingdom Wells, Ulf Ekelund, Ana Maria Baptista Menezes, Cesar Gomes Victora and Pedro C. Hallal

Background:

Physical activity may influence both fat and lean body mass. This study investigated the association between physical activity in children between the ages of 11 and 13 years and both fat and lean mass.

Methods:

A subsample of the 1993 Pelotas (Brazil) Birth Cohort was visited in 2004–2005 and 2006–2007. Physical activity was estimated through standardized questionnaires. Body composition (ie, fat and lean mass) was measured using deuterium dilution. Those with moderate-to-vigorous activity greater than 420 min/wk were classified as active, and physical activity trajectory was defined as being above or below the cutoff at each visit.

Results:

Four hundred eighty-eight adolescents (51.8% boys) were evaluated. The mean difference in fat mass in boys and girls who reported ≥ 420 min/wk of physical activity in both visits compared with those who were consistently inactive was –4.8 kg (P ≤ .001). There was an inverse association between physical activity and fat mass among boys in both crude and confounder-adjusted analyses, whereas for girls, the association was evident only in the crude analysis. There was no significant association between physical activity and lean mass.

Conclusion:

Physical activity may contribute to tackling the growing epidemic of adolescent obesity in low- and middle-income countries.

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Helen J. Moore, Catherine A. Nixon, Amelia A. Lake, Wayne Douthwaite, Claire L. O’Malley, Claire L. Pedley, Carolyn D. Summerbell and Ashley C. Routen

Background:

Evidence suggests that many contemporary urban environments do not support healthy lifestyle choices and are implicated in the obesity pandemic. Middlesbrough, in the northeast of England is one such environment and a prime target for investigation.

Methods:

To measure physical activity (PA) levels in a sample of 28 adolescents (aged 11 to 14 years) and describe the environmental context of their activity and explore where they are most and least active over a 7-day period, accelerometry and Global Positioning System (GPS) technology were used. Twenty-five of these participants also took part in focus groups about their experiences and perceptions of PA engagement.

Results:

Findings indicated that all participants were relatively inactive throughout the observed period although bouts of moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were identified in 4 contexts: school, home, street, and rural/urban green spaces, with MVPA levels highest in the school setting. Providing access to local facilities and services (such as leisure centers) is not in itself sufficient to engage adolescents in MVPA.

Conclusion:

Factors influencing engagement in MVPA were identified within and across contexts, including ‘time’ as both a facilitator and barrier, perceptions of ‘gendered’ PA, and the social influences of peer groups and family members.

Open access

Sathvik Namburar, William Checkley, Oscar Flores-Flores, Karina M. Romero, Katherine Tomaino Fraser, Nadia N. Hansel, Suzanne L. Pollard and GASP Study Investigators

less physically active than children without asthma and that the majority of children would have physical activity levels below those recommended by international guidelines. 1 Definitions We defined asthma as having had symptoms of asthma or medication use for asthma in the previous 12 months. The

Open access

Damien Moore, Tania Pizzari, Jodie McClelland and Adam I. Semciw

Gluteus medius (GMed) activity levels have been evaluated across a range of therapeutic exercises. 1 In most cases, single-leg weight-bearing exercises show greater activity levels than non-weight-bearing exercises when measured with a single-surface electrode over the middle GMed region. 1

Open access

Janet E. Fulton, David M. Buchner, Susan A. Carlson, Deborah Borbely, Kenneth M. Rose, Ann E. O’Connor, Janelle P. Gunn and Ruth Petersen

of chronic diseases, achieving population-level improvement can be challenging. Physical activity levels of Americans remain low, with only small improvements over the past 20 years. 6 In 2015, approximately half of US adults and 3 quarters of US high school students (about 130 million people) did

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Dimitrios Poulimeneas, Maria I. Maraki, Eleni Karfopoulou, Yannis Koutras, Stavrie Chrysostomou, Costas A. Anastasiou, Stavros A. Kavouras and Mary Yannakoulia

physical activity levels, the components of the activity have not been well investigated. As an example, the physical activity patterns of maintainers in the National Weight Control Registry largely vary 10 ; while vigorous exercises account for one-third of the weekly energy expenditure of maintainers