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Christiana M.T. van Loo, Anthony D. Okely, Marijka Batterham, Tina Hinkley, Ulf Ekelund, Soren Brage, John J. Reilly, Gregory E. Peoples, Rachel Jones, Xanne Janssen and Dylan P. Cliff

Background:

To validate the activPAL3 algorithm for predicting metabolic equivalents (TAMETs) and classifying MVPA in 5- to 12-year-old children.

Methods:

Fifty-seven children (9.2 ± 2.3y, 49.1% boys) completed 14 activities including sedentary behaviors (SB), light (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activities (MVPA). Indirect calorimetry (IC) was used as the criterion measure. Analyses included equivalence testing, Bland-Altman procedures and area under the receiver operating curve (ROC-AUC).

Results:

At the group level, TAMETs were significantly equivalent to IC for handheld e-game, writing/coloring, and standing class activity (P < .05). Overall, TAMETs were overestimated for SB (7.9 ± 6.7%) and LPA (1.9 ± 20.2%) and underestimated for MVPA (27.7 ± 26.6%); however, classification accuracy of MVPA was good (ROC-AUC = 0.86). Limits of agreement were wide for all activities, indicating large individual error (SB: −27.6% to 44.7%; LPA: −47.1% to 51.0%; MVPA: −88.8% to 33.9%).

Conclusions:

TAMETs were accurate for some SB and standing, but were overestimated for overall SB and LPA, and underestimated for MVPA. Accuracy for classifying MVPA was, however, acceptable.

Open access

Nicole C.A. Strock, Kristen J. Koltun, Emily A. Southmayd, Nancy I. Williams and Mary Jane De Souza

Harris–Benedict, Cunningham (1980 and 1991), and DXA prediction methods against indirect calorimetry-measured RMR; (b) determine how each ratio relates to known physiological consequences of energy deficiency; and (c) confirm the use of a 0.90 ratio or propose alternative threshold cutoff values for use

Open access

Maurice R. Puyau, Anne L. Adolph, Yan Liu, Theresa A. Wilson, Issa F. Zakeri and Nancy F. Butte

Background:

The absolute energy cost of activities in children increases with age due to greater muscle mass and physical capability associated with growth and developmental maturation; however, there is a paucity of data in preschool-aged children. Study aims were 1) to describe absolute and relative energy cost of common activities of preschool-aged children in terms of VO2, energy expenditure (kilocalories per minute) and child-specific metabolic equivalents (METs) measured by room calorimetry for use in the Youth Compendium of Physical Activity, and 2) to predict METs from age, sex and heart rate (HR).

Methods:

Energy expenditure (EE), oxygen consumption (VO2), HR, and child-METs of 13 structured activities were measured by room respiration calorimetry in 119 healthy children, ages 3 to 5 years.

Results:

EE, VO2, HR, and child-METs are presented for 13 structured activities ranging from sleeping, sedentary, low-, moderate- to high-active. A significant curvilinear relationship was observed between child-METs and HR (r 2 = .85; P = .001).

Conclusion:

Age-specific child METs for 13 structured activities in preschool-aged children will be useful to extend the Youth Compendium of Physical Activity for research purposes and practical applications. HR may serve as an objective measure of MET intensity in preschool-aged children.

Open access

Wonwoo Byun, Allison Barry and Jung-Min Lee

Background:

There has been a call for updating the Youth Compendium of Energy Expenditure (YCEE) by including energy expenditure (EE) data of young children (ie, < 6-year-old children). Therefore, this study examined the activity EE in 3 to 6 year old children using indirect calorimetry.

Methods:

Using Oxycon Mobile portable indirect calorimetry, both the oxygen consumption (VO2) and the EE of 28 children (Girls: 46%, Age: 4.8 ± 1.0, BMI: 16.4 ± 1.6) were measured while they performed various daily living activities (eg, watching TV, playing with toys, shooting baskets, soccer).

Results:

Across physical activities, averages of VO2 (ml·kg·min-1), VO2 (L·min-1), and EE ranged from 8.9 ± 1.5 to 33.3 ± 4.8 ml·kg·min-1, from 0.17 ± 0.04 to 0.64 ± 0.16 L·min-1, and from 0.8 ± 0.2 to 3.2 ± 0.7 kcal·min-1, respectively.

Conclusions:

These findings will contribute to the upcoming YCEE update.

Open access

Jung-Min Lee, Pedro F. Saint-Maurice, Youngwon Kim, Glenn A. Gaesser and Gregory Welk

Background:

The assessment of physical activity (PA) and energy expenditure (EE) in youth is complicated by inherent variability in growth and maturation during childhood and adolescence. This study provides descriptive summaries of the EE of a diverse range of activities in children ages 7 to 13.

Methods:

A sample of 105 7- to 13-year-old children (boys: 57%, girls: 43%, and Age: 9.9 ± 1.9) performed a series of 12 activities from a pool of 24 activities while being monitored with an indirect calorimetry system.

Results:

Across physical activities, averages of VO2 ml·kg·min-1, VO2 L·min-1, EE, and METs ranged from 3.3 to 53.7 ml·kg·min-1, from 0.15 to 3.2 L·min-1, from 0.7 to 15.9 kcal·min-1, 1.5 MET to 7.8 MET, respectively.

Conclusions:

The energy costs of the activities varied by age, sex, and BMI status reinforcing the need to consider adjustments when examining the relative intensity of PA in youth.

Open access

Alison L. Innerd and Liane B. Azevedo

Background:

The aim of this study is to establish the energy expenditure (EE) of a range of child-relevant activities and to compare different methods of estimating activity MET.

Methods:

27 children (17 boys) aged 9 to 11 years participated. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 routines of 6 activities ranging from sedentary to vigorous intensity. Indirect calorimetry was used to estimate resting and physical activity EE. Activity metabolic equivalent (MET) was determined using individual resting metabolic rate (RMR), the Harrell-MET and the Schofield equation.

Results:

Activity EE ranges from 123.7± 35.7 J/min/Kg (playing cards) to 823.1 ± 177.8 J/min/kg (basketball). Individual RMR, the Harrell-MET and the Schofield equation MET prediction were relatively similar at light and moderate but not at vigorous intensity. Schofield equation provided a better comparison with the Compendium of Energy Expenditure for Youth.

Conclusion:

This information might be advantageous to support the development of a new Compendium of Energy Expenditure for Youth.

Open access

Melanna F. Cox, Greg J. Petrucci Jr., Robert T. Marcotte, Brittany R. Masteller, John Staudenmayer, Patty S. Freedson and John R. Sirard

various features of the accelerometer data to estimate PA and SB. Algorithms to estimate PA from accelerometer data often rely on laboratory calibration studies that use indirect calorimetry as a criterion measure for activity intensity. Laboratory calibration protocols require participants to complete

Open access

and VO2peak, (utilising indirect calorimetry), venous blood sampling, cardiac scanning, strength (1-RM bench press/back squat), power (force velocity profile) and total mood disturbance (TMD) via a profile of mood states (POMS) assessments were made at regular intervals. Training consisted of specific

Full access

Greg Petrucci Jr., Patty Freedson, Brittany Masteller, Melanna Cox, John Staudenmayer and John Sirard

-structured lab protocol examining the validity of five wrist-worn consumer activity trackers the MS demonstrated the lowest accuracy and precision for estimated kCals, compared with indirect calorimetry ( Bai et al., 2016 ). This laboratory protocol consisted of three sessions: 1) 20 minutes of sedentary

Open access

Matthew Pearce, Tom R.P. Bishop, Stephen Sharp, Kate Westgate, Michelle Venables, Nicholas J. Wareham and Søren Brage

calorimetry during net lipid synthesis . The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition . doi: 10.1093/ajcn/47.4.591 3281433 10.1093/ajcn/47.4.591 Fortier , I. , Burton , P.R. , Robson , P.J. , Ferretti , V. , Little , J. , L’Heureux , F. , . . . Hudson , T.J. ( 2010 ). Quality, quantity and