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Alicia M. Kissinger-Knox, Nicole J. Norheim, Denise S. Vagt, Kevin P. Mulligan and Frank M. Webbe

also that athletes (all male) reported more symptoms when the examiner was female versus male, although the group sizes for this comparison were fairly small (N = 20–30). 10 With technological advancements, computer-based assessments have been integrated into the process of concussion evaluation and

Open access

Chunbo Liu

at the set value. The high precision (Accuracy ± 0.5%) power meter UPM209 Energy Analyser (Algodue Elettronica, Fontaneto d’Agogna, Italy) was used for monitoring the whole power of the training system. The upper computer was used for collecting data and controlling the eccentric trainer

Open access

Melissa Lau, Li Wang, Sari Acra and Maciej S. Buchowski

Background:

Standardized measures of energy expenditure (EE) for sedentary activities in youth are needed. The goal was to determine EE of common contemporary and computer-related sedentary activities in youth.

Methods:

We measured EE for sedentary tasks in 10- to 17-year-old youths (n = 24) during ~24 hours in a whole-room indirect calorimeter. Directly monitored tasks were performed for ~10-min. EE was calculated from oxygen consumed and carbon dioxide produced, converted to metabolic equivalents (MET) by normalization to an individual’s measured resting EE, and compared with the Compendium of Energy Expenditures for Youth.

Results:

Compared with the youth compendium, measured METs were lower for internet surfing (1.3), computer keyboard typing (1.3), and sorting beads/crafts (1.5) (all P < .002), and similar for handwriting (1.4), playing cards (1.6), video-gaming (1.6), and telephoning (1.5).

Conclusions:

Current youth compendium MET estimates should be used with caution when predicting EE of common contemporary and computer-related sedentary activities in youth.

Open access

Yong Gao, Haichun Sun, Jie Zhuang, Jian Zhang, Lynda Ransdell, Zheng Zhu and Siya Wang

Background:

This study determined the metabolic equivalents (METs) of several activities typically performed by Chinese youth.

Methods:

Thirty youth (12 years) performed 7 activities that reflected their daily activities while Energy Expenditure (EE) was measured in a metabolic chamber.

Results:

METs were calculated as activity EE divided by participant’s measured resting metabolic rate. A MET value ranging from 0.8 to 1.2 was obtained for sleeping, watching TV, playing computer games, reading and doing homework. Performing radio gymnastics had a MET value of 2.9. Jumping rope at low effort required 3.1 METs. Except for watching TV, METs for other activities in this study were lower than Youth Compendium values.

Conclusions:

The results provide empirical evidence for more accurately assessing EE of activities commonly performed by Chinese youth. This is the first study to determine METs for radio gymnastics and jump rope in Chinese youth.

Open access

Carl G. Mattacola

to advance their scholarly agenda. While much of the work is done behind a computer screen and via a keyboard, I hope that I was able to provide the power of a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, or honest compliment to improve the quality of a manuscript and support those willing to share original

Open access

Brigid M. Lynch, Charles E. Matthews, Katrien Wijndaele and on behalf of the Sedentary Behaviour Council of the International Society for Physical Activity and Health

”), and Screen time (“period of activities done in front of an electronic screen, such as watching television , working on a computer, or playing video games”). These new MeSH terms will not be retrospectively applied but will be added to new research published in MEDLINE from January 2019 onward. The

Open access

Marcie Fyock, Nelson Cortes, Alex Hulse and Joel Martin

. Visual feedback using a mirror or a real-time computer display may then be used with verbal cues during retraining sessions. The included studies suggest that verbal feedback at higher frequencies over the first 4 sessions, and then gradually decreasing over the final 4 sessions, leads to positive

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Paweł Zembura, Agata Korcz, Elżbieta Cieśla, Aleksandra Gołdys and Hanna Nałȩcz

mean scores of the eight fitness tests. Dobosz et al, 8 study was the main source of data. Sedentary Behaviours D 40% of 11- to 15-year-olds reported watching TV and films, 65.9% playing computer games, and 45.2% reported performing other computer-based activites 1 49% of lower-secondary and 44% of

Open access

Adrienne R. Hughes, Avril Johnstone, Farid Bardid and John J. Reilly

-15 year olds reported spending > 2 hrs/d in TV viewing alone. On weekdays, 65% of boys (78% weekend) and 46% of girls (57% weekend) played screen-based electronic games for > 2 hrs/day, and 66% of girls (74% weekend) and 60% of boys (68% weekend) used computers for purposes other than games for >2hrs

Open access

Patty Freedson

In the past, a self-report measure of sitting time, TV time, and/or computer time was the method typically used to assess sedentary time. More recently, wearable accelerometers have become the method of choice to improve measurement accuracy and precision. Numerous prediction methods are available