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Hannah G. Calvert, Matthew T. Mahar, Brian Flay and Lindsey Turner

interaction terms to test a priori hypothesized disparities. Given literature showing that males accrue more steps than females across the school day, 18 we hypothesized that males would accrue more steps than females during all PA opportunities (PE, recess, and CBPA). Similarly, given that PA levels are

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Peter T. Katzmarzyk, Kara D. Denstel, Kim Beals, Christopher Bolling, Carly Wright, Scott E. Crouter, Thomas L. McKenzie, Russell R. Pate, Brian E. Saelens, Amanda E. Staiano, Heidi I. Stanish and Susan B. Sisson

Background:

The 2016 United States (U.S.) Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth provides a comprehensive evaluation of physical activity levels and factors influencing physical activity among children and youth.

Methods:

The report card includes 10 indicators: Overall Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, Active Transportation, Organized Sport Participation, Active Play, Health-related Fitness, Family and Peers, School, Community and the Built Environment, and Government Strategies and Investments. Nationally representative data were used to evaluate the indicators using a standard grading rubric.

Results:

Sufficient data were available to assign grades to 7 of the indicators, and these ranged from B- for Community and the Built Environment to F for Active Transportation. Overall Physical Activity received a grade of D- due to the low prevalence of meeting physical activity guidelines. A grade of D was assigned to Health-related Fitness, reflecting the low prevalence of meeting cardiorespiratory fitness standards. Disparities across age, gender, racial/ethnic and socioeconomic groups were observed for several indicators.

Conclusions:

Continued poor grades suggest that additional work is required to provide opportunities for U.S. children to be physically active. The observed disparities indicate that special attention should be given to girls, minorities, and those from lower socioeconomic groups when implementing intervention strategies.

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Mouza Al Zaabi, Syed Mahboob Shah, Mohamud Sheek-Hussein, Abdishakur Abdulle, Abdulla Al Junaibi and Tom Loney

Background:

The Active Healthy Kids 2016 United Arab Emirates (UAE) Report Card provides a systematic evaluation of how the UAE is performing in supporting and engaging physical activity (PA) in children and adolescents.

Methods:

The Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance framework and standardized set of procedures were used to perform the systematic assessment of PA in UAE youth and children. Indicator grades were based on the proportion of children and youth achieving a defined benchmark: A = 81% to 100%; B = 61% to 80%; C = 41% to 60%; D = 21% to 40%; F = 0% to 20%; INC = incomplete data.

Results:

Overall Physical Activity Level and Active Transportation both received a grade of D-/F-. Sedentary Behavior and Family and Peers both received a C- minus grade and School was graded D. Minus grades indicate PA disparities related to age, gender, nationality, socioeconomic status, and geographic location. Government Strategies and Investments received a B+ grade. Sport Participation, Active Play, and Community and the Built Environment were graded INC due to a lack of nationally representative data for all 7 emirates.

Conclusions:

The majority of UAE children are not achieving the daily recommended level of PA. The UAE leadership has invested significant resources into improving PA through school- and community-based PA interventions; however, inter- and intraemirate population-based strategies remain fragmented.

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Ricky Camplain, Julie A. Baldwin, Meghan Warren, Carolyn Camplain, Monica R. Lininger and Robert T. Trotter

; however, none of these strategies have been implemented in jails. Physical activity policy reform in the jail setting has important implications for addressing health disparities among those who are incarcerated for extended periods of time—especially as the majority of those individuals serving time in

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Katrina L. Piercy, Frances Bevington, Alison Vaux-Bjerke, Sandra Williams Hilfiker, Sean Arayasirikul and Elizabeth Y. Barnett

, Overall Knowledge of Physical Activity and Dosage, and Awareness of the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Currently, less than 25% (24.3%) of adults meet the aerobic and muscle-strengthening physical activity recommendations. 21 However, there are disparities across age, gender, race, education

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Lori A. Gano-Overway

, Bladek, Forsythe, Hamel, & McChesney, 2018; Tinius, Ringenberg, & Maples, 2018, this issue) as well as disparities and differences that affect the health, livelihood, and well-being of women (e.g., see Kane & LaVoi, 2018, this issue). Further, many of the same issues that were apparent when the journal

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Peter T. Katzmarzyk, Kara D. Denstel, Kim Beals, Jordan Carlson, Scott E. Crouter, Thomas L. McKenzie, Russell R. Pate, Susan B. Sisson, Amanda E. Staiano, Heidi Stanish, Dianne S. Ward, Melicia Whitt-Glover and Carly Wright

Report). 1 Approximately 37% of 6-12 year old children reported playing a team sport (organized or unorganized) on a regular basis (State of Play 2017 Report). 1 There is a significant socioeconomic disparity in sport participation: approximately 12% of children from high-income households (≥$100

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Steven Loy

?” And so, I challenged my classes to take their knowledge to the people and make changes in community health by increasing people’s physical activity. Show and educate participants, particularly in underserved communities where health disparities are the greatest, what to do to meet the Centers for

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Asaduzzaman Khan, Mohammad Abdul Kadir, Sohel Reza Choudhury, Fatema Ashraf, Mahbubur Rahman, Kazi Rumana Ahmed, K. M. Saif-Ur-Rahman, Sonia Parvin and Riaz Uddin

gender disparities with 40.2% girls and 42.0% boys meeting the recommendations. 2 Organised Sport Participation INC* See note 1 Active Play INC See note 1 Active Transportation C- According to the 2014 Bangladesh School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS), 41.1% of students aged 13-17 years used active

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Bilyana Mileva

such as Eurostat 914 Barometer survey or UNICEF Health Behavior in School-aged Children and other national sources. However, facing this insufficiency, disparity and incomparability of existing data, the core of Bulgaria’s 2018 Report Card was informed by a survey of 1014 Bulgarian children aged 6 to