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Wendy Yajun Huang, Stephen Heung-Sang Wong, Martin Chi-Sang Wong, Cindy Hui-Ping Sit, Raymond Kim-Wai Sum and Gang He

Background:

Hong Kong’s 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity (PA) for Children and Youth is the first evidence-based synthesis of various indicators related to individual behaviors that contribute to overall PA levels, settings and sources of influence, and strategies and investments in Hong Kong.

Methods:

Following a standardized protocol, currently best available data for Hong Kong youth were collated and evaluated by an expert consensus panel on 9 indicators (5 activity behaviors and 4 influences on these behaviors).

Results:

Less than half of the children and youth met the recommended PA level. As a result, a D grade was given for Overall PA levels. Organized Sport Participation and Active Transportation received grades of C- and B, respectively. Sedentary Behaviors and School scored a C grade. Community and the Built Environment scored a grade of B. Family Influence received as low a score as Overall PA (D). Active Play and Government were not graded due to incomplete data.

Conclusions:

PA levels are low and sedentary behaviors are high for children and youth in Hong Kong. Promising policies exist in schools and features of community and the built environment are favorable. Increasing family support should be emphasized for future PA promotion.

Open access

Hannah Wilkie, Martyn Standage, Lauren Sherar, Sean Cumming, Caley Parnell, Adrian Davis, Charlie Foster and Russ Jago

Background:

Regular physical activity improves physical and mental health, yet children’s physical activity levels were low in England’s 2014 Report Card. Within this paper, we update the 2014 Report Card to assess current information for the 9 indicators of physical activity.

Methods:

A search for nationally representative data on 9 indicators of physical activity was conducted and the data were assessed by an expert panel. The panel assigned grades [ie, A, B, C, D, F, or INC (incomplete)] to each indicator based on whether children across England were achieving specific benchmarks. The 2016 Report Card was produced and disseminated.

Results:

The following grades were awarded: Overall Physical Activity Levels: D-; Organized Sport Participation: D; Active Play: INC; Active Transportation: C-; Sedentary Behaviors: INC; Family and Peers: INC; School: B+; Community and the Built Environment: B; Government Strategies and Investment: INC.

Conclusions:

The grades have not improved since the 2014 Report Card and several gaps in the literature are still present. While children’s physical activity levels remain low alongside competing sedentary choices, further national plans and investment with local actions are urgently needed to promote physical activity especially via active play, active transport, and family support.

Open access

Wendy Y. Huang, Stephen H.S. Wong, Cindy H.P. Sit, Martin C.S. Wong, Raymond K.W. Sum, Sam W.S. Wong and Jane J. Yu

behaviors despite a generally favorable community environment. The low level of family support warrant more public health actions. There is a surveillance gap in active play and peer support that researchers should address. Funding Source The 2018 Hong Kong Report Card is funded by Tin Ka Ping Foundation

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Angela Maria Hoyos-Quintero and Herney Andrés García-Perdomo

) Gender (biological) Dowda et al (2011), 13 SC, USA Cross-sectional as part of the CHAMPS study 369 Average age: 4.2 y Accelerometer >5 h/d and OSRAC BMI, quality of the preschool, and PA Family support ( P  < .001), quality of the preschool ( P  < .001), access to equipment ( P  < .001), and the

Open access

Karin Lobenius-Palmér, Birgitta Sjöqvist, Anita Hurtig-Wennlöf and Lars-Olov Lundqvist

disabilities aged 7–20 years. Participants Participants were recruited from the Child and Youth Habilitation Centre (CYHC), Region Örebro County, Sweden. CYHC provides community-based rehabilitation and family support services for youth (aged 0–20 years) with various disabilities. All youth with disabilities

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Laura K. Fewell, Riley Nickols, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney and Cheri A. Levinson

this finding is that aspects of sport (e.g., social relationships with sport family, support and oversight from sport personnel) may allow for improved psychosocial functioning for athletes compared to non-athletes without such relational opportunities. Higher levels of ED symptomatology were also