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Lawrence Frank, Jacqueline Kerr, Dori Rosenberg and Abby King

Background:

Suburban development patterns may impede physical activity (PA) and mobility and affect healthy aging. This paper investigates the relationships between neighborhood design and walking, driving, PA, and obesity in adults over age 65 years.

Methods:

Data from the SMARTRAQ (Atlanta region) survey provided measures of PA, BMI, SES, and travel patterns. Neighborhood design was measured using a walkability index (residential density, street connectivity, retail density, and land use mix). Chi square and regression was used to evaluate relationships.

Results:

Increased walkability was related with more walking (OR 2.02), less time spent traveling in a car (OR .53), and lower odds of being overweight (OR .68). Those with 1 or no cars were more likely to walk (OR 2.9) and spend less time in cars (OR .53); but also less likely to get recommended levels of PA (OR .55). Visiting a fast food outlet was associated with increased odds of obesity (OR 1.81).

Conclusions:

Policies are needed to bring older Americans closer to shops and services and healthy food outlets as a means of encouraging regular walking and healthy body weight. Incentives to encourage neighborhood grocery stores and affordable housing in central areas along with regulatory reform through zoning can encourage PA and healthy body weight in the elderly.

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Kelsie M. Full, Eileen Johnson, Michelle Takemoto, Sheri J. Hartman, Jacqueline Kerr, Loki Natarajan, Ruth E. Patterson and Dorothy D. Sears

critical to develop lifestyle treatment guidelines that help this population minimize the risk of cancer recurrence. However, for survivors, public health efforts should not only be focused on staying cancer free, but also on healthy aging, free of all chronic conditions. In this study, multiple biomarkers

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Brianna J. Stubbs, Pete J. Cox, Tom Kirk, Rhys D. Evans and Kieran Clarke

Declaration of Helsinki. Participants were healthy, aged 21–42 years, with no history of major illness and provided written informed consent with a confidential medical questionnaire prior to inclusion. Females were not pregnant or planning pregnancy. Anthropometric characteristics are shown in Table  1

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Samuel R. Nyman

, including the promotion of active and healthy aging ( Annear et al., 2014 ; WHO, 2002 , 2010 ), and for communities and societies be more inclusive and “dementia friendly” ( Department of Health, 2012 ; WHO, 2012 ). For example, environments designed to encourage people to be more physically active via

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Jairo H. Migueles, Alex V. Rowlands, Florian Huber, Séverine Sabia and Vincent T. van Hees

questionnaire data ( Bell et al., 2015 ); 3) the association between moderate and vigorous physical activity and healthy aging was evident whether the activity was performed in short (<10 minutes) or long (≥10 minutes) bouts ( Menai et al., 2017 ). Results from the UK Biobank also showed 1) people with

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John D. McCamley, Eric L. Cutler, Kendra K. Schmid, Shane R. Wurdeman, Jason M. Johanning, Iraklis I. Pipinos and Sara A. Myers

knee and hip. Peak power differences were observed for ankle power generation in late stance, knee power absorption and generation during early stance, and knee power absorption during late stance. Table 1 Univariate Comparison Between Patients With PAD and Healthy Age-Matched Controls Control PAD t

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Rebecca L. Krupenevich and Ross H. Miller

normal, healthy aging. This study’s scope is limited, and the participants in this study consisted of healthy and highly physically active young and older men, which may limit the generalizability of the results to a more typical, less physically active, older adult population, to older women, who were

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Maria-Christina Kosteli, Jennifer Cumming and Sarah E. Williams

healthy aging. However, it is important to first understand the key determinants of PA behavior in this population, and how techniques that can increase PA relate to the different determinants. One of the most popular theories used to explain PA behavior in middle-aged and older adults is social cognitive

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Madhura Phansikar and Sean P. Mullen

impact of active travel on cognitive aspects important for healthy aging, such as executive functioning, is less clear. Although studies have shown that walking is associated with better cognitive functioning among older adults, these studies have focused on walking as a form of LTPA ( Abbott et

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Susan Paudel, Alice J. Owen, Stephane Heritier and Ben J. Smith

leisure-time and transport-related domains. 2 , 3 It plays a vital role in healthy aging and forms an essential component of rehabilitation and recovery programs. 4 Despite all these benefits, physical inactivity is emerging as a global pandemic, and 1 in 4 adults worldwide do not meet the World Health