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Darlene A. Kluka and Anneliese Goslin

Open access

Mitch Abrams and Michelle L. Bartlett

of the subspecialties of clinical psychology, sport psychology, and forensic psychology. This paper serves to provide an overview of context-specific approaches to pertinent identification and treatment issues. An overview of sexual abuse victim and perpetrator identification will be offered along

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Eboneé N. Butler, Anita M.H. Ambs, Jill Reedy and Heather R. Bowles

Background:

Examining relationships between features of the built environment and physical activity is achievable with geographic information systems technology (GIS). The purpose of this paper is to review the literature to identify GIS measures that can be considered for inclusion in national public health surveillance efforts. In the absence of a universally agreed upon framework that integrates physical, social, and cultural aspects of the environment, we used a multidimensional model of access to synthesize the literature.

Methods:

We identified 29 studies published between 2005 and 2009 with physical activity outcomes that included 1 or more built environment variables measured using GIS. We sorted built environment measures into 5 dimensions of access: accessibility, availability, accommodation, affordability, and acceptability.

Results:

Geospatial land-use data, street network data, environmental audits, and commercial databases can be used to measure the availability, accessibility, and accommodation dimensions of access. Affordability and acceptability measures rely on census and self-report data.

Conclusions:

GIS measures have been included in studies investigating the built environment and physical activity, although few have examined more than 1 construct of access. Systematic identification and collection of relevant GIS measures can facilitate collaboration and accelerate the advancement of research on the built environment and physical activity.

Open access

Kellie C. Huxel Bliven

science published. This is an important tenant we want to maintain. One way to achieve this goal is strategic identification of topics for thematic issues, which have proven to be a successful strategy for JSR given the high number of citations of recent clinically relevant thematic issues. JSR was

Open access

Chunbo Liu

] T ∈ ℝ n c − 1 θ = [ θ s θ c ] ∈ ℝ r p + n c − 1 From Equation ( 9 ), the following identification model was obtained: y ( k ) = ϕ s T ( k ) θ s + ϕ c T ( k ) θ c = ϕ T ( k ) θ . (10) P ( Part 1) , the model was: y ( k ) = a 11 u 1 ( k ) + a 12 u 1 ( k − 1 ) + c 2 y 2 ( k ) + c 3 y 3 ( k ) . (11) A

Open access

Patty Freedson

the identification of several sedentary behavior characteristics. For example, direct observation allows one to identify not only the time a given behavior occurs (such as stationary or sedentary time), but it identifies contextual information such as when, where, and with whom the behaviors under

Open access

Shona L. Halson, Alan G. Hahn and Aaron J. Coutts

measured variables. By contrast, field testing can be conducted daily, permitting much greater resolution in the detection of trends and easier identification of abnormal results. Even where data collected in training and competition environments are slightly less controllable than those obtained in the

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Philippa M. Dall, Dawn A. Skelton, Manon L. Dontje, Elaine H. Coulter, Sally Stewart, Simon R. Cox, Richard J. Shaw, Iva Čukić, Claire F. Fitzsimons, Carolyn A. Greig, Malcolm H. Granat, Geoff Der, Ian J. Deary, Sebastien F.M. Chastin and On behalf of the Seniors USP Team

(on a secure cloud server) allowing easy review by all staff •  Data recorded to increase compliance and allow identification of systematic errors/deviation from protocol and monitor malfunction •  Member of staff with experience of data collection using the monitor assigned to triage technical issues

Open access

Sophia Nimphius

of female athletes. Note I.  Research in exercise and sport science uses the terms gender and sex . For this editorial, the term gender was used in alignment with the International Olympic Committee concerning gender identification and sport participation. Future research should consider the

Open access

Keishi Soga, Keita Kamijo and Hiroaki Masaki

picture was presented. The order of the size block and animacy block, and the stimulus-response mapping were counterbalanced across participants and conditions. Responses were classified into six categories: (a) hit was defined as the correct identification of old pictures as old, (b) miss was defined as