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Carlos Capella-Peris, Jesús Gil-Gómez and Òscar Chiva-Bartoll

producing new and interesting findings regarding the application of this methodology in PE, and, specifically, to promote the TC of PTs. Moreover, the use of mixed methods is an original approach in these kinds of studies ( Cervantes & Meaney, 2013 ), allowing us to analyze the research question from both

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Helen J. Moore, Catherine A. Nixon, Amelia A. Lake, Wayne Douthwaite, Claire L. O’Malley, Claire L. Pedley, Carolyn D. Summerbell and Ashley C. Routen

Background:

Evidence suggests that many contemporary urban environments do not support healthy lifestyle choices and are implicated in the obesity pandemic. Middlesbrough, in the northeast of England is one such environment and a prime target for investigation.

Methods:

To measure physical activity (PA) levels in a sample of 28 adolescents (aged 11 to 14 years) and describe the environmental context of their activity and explore where they are most and least active over a 7-day period, accelerometry and Global Positioning System (GPS) technology were used. Twenty-five of these participants also took part in focus groups about their experiences and perceptions of PA engagement.

Results:

Findings indicated that all participants were relatively inactive throughout the observed period although bouts of moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were identified in 4 contexts: school, home, street, and rural/urban green spaces, with MVPA levels highest in the school setting. Providing access to local facilities and services (such as leisure centers) is not in itself sufficient to engage adolescents in MVPA.

Conclusion:

Factors influencing engagement in MVPA were identified within and across contexts, including ‘time’ as both a facilitator and barrier, perceptions of ‘gendered’ PA, and the social influences of peer groups and family members.

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Simon J. Sebire, Mark J. Edwards, Kenneth R. Fox, Ben Davies, Kathryn Banfield, Lesley Wood and Russell Jago

The implementation, fidelity, and receipt of a self-determination-theory-based after-school physical activity intervention (Action 3:30) delivered by teaching assistants (TAs) was examined using a mixed-methods process evaluation. Physical activity motivation and need satisfaction were reported by 539 participants at baseline, the end of intervention, and 4-month follow-up. Pupil- and TA-reported autonomy-support and teaching efficacy were collected alongside interviews with 18 TAs and focus groups with 60 participants. Among intervention boys there were small increases in identified, introjected, and external motivation and no differences in need satisfaction. Among girls, intrinsic and identified motivation and autonomy and relatedness were lower in the intervention group. Qualitative evidence for fidelity was moderate, and boys reported greater need satisfaction than girls. TAs provided greater structure than involvement or autonomy-support and felt least efficacious when facing school-based challenges. The findings highlight the refinements needed to enhance theoretical fidelity and intervention effectiveness for boys and girls.

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Maureen R. Weiss, Lindsay E. Kipp, Alison Phillips Reichter, Sarah M. Espinoza and Nicole D. Bolter

Purpose: Girls on the Run is an after-school physical activity-based positive youth development program designed to enhance girls’ social, psychological, and physical development. We evaluated the effectiveness of the program by employing a longitudinal design and mixed methods. Methods: Girls (N = 203; aged 8–11 y) completed survey measures of positive youth development constructs (competence, confidence, connection, character, and caring), physical activity, and sedentary behavior prior to, at the end of, and 3 months after the season. Subsamples of girls, coaches, caregivers, and school personnel participated in focus groups. Coaches completed information about their team’s community impact project and number of girls who completed the season-ending 5k. Results: The full sample improved in confidence and connection, whereas girls who started below the preseason average showed the greatest gains from preseason to postseason on all measures, and scores were maintained or continued to improve at follow-up. All stakeholders in focus groups corroborated evidence of season-long improvement in social and emotional behaviors and health outcomes. Involvement in the community impact project contributed to girls’ growth in character and empathy skills. Conclusion: Findings provide empirical evidence that Girls on the Run is effective in promoting positive youth development, including season-long and lasting change in competence, confidence, connection, character, caring, and physical activity, especially among girls who exhibited lower preseason scores than their peers.

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Lori A. Gano-Overway

research, theoretical papers, reviews, practical articles, and commentaries from a diversity of disciplinary perspectives using varied methodologies. I would like to continue to encourage these submissions; however, I would certainly welcome work that is interdisciplinary or uses mixed method approaches

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Ricky Camplain, Julie A. Baldwin, Meghan Warren, Carolyn Camplain, Monica R. Lininger and Robert T. Trotter

in jail populations: protocol for a mixed-methods study . JMIR Res Protoc . 2018 ; 7 ( 10 ): 10337 . 10.2196/10337 5. Stephan J , Walsh G . Census of Jail Facilities, 2006 . Washington, DC : US Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics ; 2011 . 6. Bai

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Hebe Schaillée, Ramón Spaaij, Ruth Jeanes and Marc Theeboom

materialize. The selection of two cases allowed for comparative analysis of knowledge translation practices and the effect of enablers and constraints within the study contexts. Table  1 outlines the main characteristics of the two studies. Both studies are applied research projects that used a mixed methods

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René van Bavel, Gabriele Esposito, Tom Baranowski and Néstor Duch-Brown

behaviour among 18–25 year olds: A mixed method study . BMC Public Health, 12 , 640 . PubMed doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-12-640 Priebe , C.S. , & Spink , K.S. ( 2011 ). When in Rome: Descriptive norms and physical activity . Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 12 , 93 – 98 . doi: 10.1016/j

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Kelly P. Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Viviane Grassmann, Krystn Orr, Amy C. McPherson, Guy E. Faulkner and F. Virginia Wright

reference to the strength of existing evidence. Three reviewers (V.G., K.O., and K.A.N.) independently appraised the quality of each of the included studies (53.5% agreement) using a 16-item quality assessment tool that can be applied to quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method studies ( Sirriyeh, Lawton

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Pirkko Markula

methods books in sport sociology/physical cultural studies typically introduce a familiar range of methods: different forms of ethnography (visual, autoethnography), interviews, and media analysis (old and new media) with such additions as narrative analysis, mixed methods, case studies, or participatory