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Juliessa M. Pavon, Richard J. Sloane, Carl F. Pieper, Cathleen S. Colón-Emeric, David Gallagher, Harvey J. Cohen, Katherine S. Hall, Miriam C. Morey, Midori McCarty, Thomas L. Ortel and Susan N. Hastings

for conditions such as delirium and venous thromboembolism (VTE). The example of VTE is particularly salient because clinical practice guidelines explicitly recommend consideration of mobility status when making decisions about anticoagulant use. Many clinicians have adopted near universal use of

Open access

Dawn C. Mackey, Alexander D. Perkins, Kaitlin Hong Tai, Joanie Sims-Gould and Heather A. McKay

Physical activity promotes mobility and independence ( Pahor et al., 2014 ), helps to prevent and manage a variety of chronic diseases ( Lee et al., 2012 ), reduces the risk of falls and related injuries ( Gillespie et al., 2012 ), and enhances physical, mental, and social health ( Bauman, Merom

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Hayley E. Christian, Charlotte D. Klinker, Karen Villanueva, Matthew W. Knuiman, Sarah A. Foster, Stephan R. Zubrick, Mark Divitini, Lisa Wood and Billie Giles-Corti

Background:

Relationships between context-specific measures of the physical and social environment and children’s independent mobility to neighborhood destination types were examined.

Methods:

Parents in RESIDE’s fourth survey reported whether their child (8–15 years; n = 181) was allowed to travel without an adult to school, friend’s house, park and local shop. Objective physical environment measures were matched to each of these destinations. Social environment measures included neighborhood perceptions and items specific to local independent mobility.

Results:

Independent mobility to local destinations ranged from 30% to 48%. Independent mobility to a local park was less likely as the distance to the closest park (small and large size) increased and less likely with additional school grounds (P < .05). Independent mobility to school was less likely as the distance to the closest large park increased and if the neighborhood was perceived as unsafe (P < .05). Independent mobility to a park or shops decreased if parenting social norms were unsupportive of children’s local independent movement (P < .05).

Conclusions:

Independent mobility appears dependent upon the specific destination being visited and the impact of neighborhood features varies according to the destination examined. Findings highlight the importance of access to different types and sizes of urban green space for children’s independent mobility to parks.

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Beth G. Clarkson, Elwyn Cox and Richard C. Thelwell

that they are a better head coach than you. Introduction to the Second Vignette: Work–Life Conflicts, Limited Career Mobility, and Marginalization In the second vignette, experiences of work–life conflicts, limited career mobility, and an ingrained system of prejudice in which men hold the power and

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Matthew J. Hussey, Alex E. Boron-Magulick, Tamara C. Valovich McLeod and Cailee E. Welch Bacon

Clinical Scenario Shoulder range of motion (ROM) in throwing athletes relies on a balance of mobility and stability to maintain proper function and health. Prior research has reported that deficits in internal rotation greater than 20°, decreases in total arc of motion greater than 5° when compared

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Tomohiro Yasuda

to evaluate the functional status of individuals and to identify and treat those at risk for mobility problems and frailty. In the periodic and field-based simplified approaches, the handgrip strength measurement has been widely used in clinical practice for the assessment of muscle size or strength

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Landon Lempke, Rebecca Wilkinson, Caitlin Murray and Justin Stanek

then, the knee extended until mild discomfort was felt for both interventions. Subjects had baseline hamstring mobility assessed. Participants were randomly assigned following baseline assessment to either 5 min of PNF or SS. Two additional variables were assessed by either 5 min following stretching

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Lawrence Frank, Jacqueline Kerr, Dori Rosenberg and Abby King

Background:

Suburban development patterns may impede physical activity (PA) and mobility and affect healthy aging. This paper investigates the relationships between neighborhood design and walking, driving, PA, and obesity in adults over age 65 years.

Methods:

Data from the SMARTRAQ (Atlanta region) survey provided measures of PA, BMI, SES, and travel patterns. Neighborhood design was measured using a walkability index (residential density, street connectivity, retail density, and land use mix). Chi square and regression was used to evaluate relationships.

Results:

Increased walkability was related with more walking (OR 2.02), less time spent traveling in a car (OR .53), and lower odds of being overweight (OR .68). Those with 1 or no cars were more likely to walk (OR 2.9) and spend less time in cars (OR .53); but also less likely to get recommended levels of PA (OR .55). Visiting a fast food outlet was associated with increased odds of obesity (OR 1.81).

Conclusions:

Policies are needed to bring older Americans closer to shops and services and healthy food outlets as a means of encouraging regular walking and healthy body weight. Incentives to encourage neighborhood grocery stores and affordable housing in central areas along with regulatory reform through zoning can encourage PA and healthy body weight in the elderly.

Open access

Stephen S. Cheung

almost complete inactivity and prolonged rehabilitation has been a sobering journey. It has also taught me a few valuable lessons about the challenges faced by those without full mobility and what it means to hold the door open for others. The issue of accessibility comes into stark relief when on

Open access

Victoria Fauntroy, Marcie Fyock, Jena Hansen-Honeycutt, Esther Nolton and Jatin P. Ambegaonkar

: SFMA results Secondary outcomes : VAS, special test results, thoracic spine joint mobility Primary outcomes : SFMA results, DPA scale scores, NPRS scores, special test results Secondary outcomes : DPA scale scores, NPRS scores, special test results. Primary outcomes : SFMA and FMS results Secondary