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Jolynn S. Kuhlman and Kathy S. Boone Ginter

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Pitre C. Bourdon, Marco Cardinale, Andrew Murray, Paul Gastin, Michael Kellmann, Matthew C. Varley, Tim J. Gabbett, Aaron J. Coutts, Darren J. Burgess, Warren Gregson and N. Timothy Cable

Monitoring the load placed on athletes in both training and competition has become a very hot topic in sport science. Both scientists and coaches routinely monitor training loads using multidisciplinary approaches, and the pursuit of the best methodologies to capture and interpret data has produced an exponential increase in empirical and applied research. Indeed, the field has developed with such speed in recent years that it has given rise to industries aimed at developing new and novel paradigms to allow us to precisely quantify the internal and external loads placed on athletes and to help protect them from injury and ill health. In February 2016, a conference on “Monitoring Athlete Training Loads—The Hows and the Whys” was convened in Doha, Qatar, which brought together experts from around the world to share their applied research and contemporary practices in this rapidly growing field and also to investigate where it may branch to in the future. This consensus statement brings together the key findings and recommendations from this conference in a shared conceptual framework for use by coaches, sport-science and -medicine staff, and other related professionals who have an interest in monitoring athlete training loads and serves to provide an outline on what athlete-load monitoring is and how it is being applied in research and practice, why load monitoring is important and what the underlying rationale and prospective goals of monitoring are, and where athlete-load monitoring is heading in the future.

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Erica M. Willadsen, Andrea B. Zahn and Chris J. Durall

determine the most effective training paradigm for reducing noncontact ACL injury risk. • The search generated 2 level 1b randomized control trials (RCTs) and 1 level 2b cohort study. These studies examined the effects of plyometric exercise, balance training, core stabilization training, and neuromuscular

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Walter Herzog

Reflections on Muscle: Intuition, Truth, Serendipity and Paradigms . “Muscle” had to be in the title because it is the only thing that I can competently talk about, and “Intuition”, “Truth”, “Serendipity,” and “Paradigms” seemed to describe events and processes in my scientific life that formed me and taught

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Lauren A. Brown, Eric E. Hall, Caroline J. Ketcham, Kirtida Patel, Thomas A. Buckley, David R. Howell and Srikant Vallabhajosula

more complex challenge to the athlete’s brain and thereby be more sensitive in detecting motor deficits. 9 Previous research has used dual-task paradigms to show that gait impairments exist postconcussion but even after self-reported symptom resolution. 6 , 10 – 14 In addition, a dual

Open access

Keith Baar

% more up to 180 s. This suggests that heavy isometric holds lasting 30 s will be sufficient to provide a similar degree of stress relaxation as holds lasting six times longer. Therefore, the rationale for the loading paradigm was to use stress relaxation to provide a tensile load to the cells within the

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Yuhei Inoue, Mikihiro Sato and Kevin Filo

contributions to well-being. The current special issue addresses this need by advancing the theoretical and empirical understanding of transformative sport service research (TSSR). This emergent area builds on a transformative research paradigm through which we seek to understand the role of consumption and

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Louisa D. Raisbeck, Jed A. Diekfuss, Dustin R. Grooms and Randy Schmitz

internal focus, whereas the visual target was present during all rest and move blocks for the external focus. We also acknowledge that asking participants to adhere to a metronome may have elicited a dual-task paradigm 21 , 22 ; however, our contrast analyses allowed us to solely focus on instruction

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Patty Freedson

to six days of valid data. When comparing age groups, the RMSE values were greater for children and adolescents, compared with adults and older adults. This difference emphasizes the need to consider longer data collection protocols beyond the one-week paradigm for children and adolescents

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Iñigo Mujika and Ritva S. Taipale

due to increased participation and the opportunity for more women to train and compete professionally, there are many unexplored or only superficially explored research paradigms that could contribute to decreasing this performance gap. It is imperative to recognize previous sport-science research on