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Jeffer Eidi Sasaki, Cheryl A. Howe, Dinesh John, Amanda Hickey, Jeremy Steeves, Scott Conger, Kate Lyden, Sarah Kozey-Keadle, Sarah Burkart, Sofiya Alhassan, David Bassett Jr and Patty S. Freedson

Background:

Thirty-five percent of the activities assigned MET values in the Compendium of Energy Expenditures for Youth were obtained from direct measurement of energy expenditure (EE). The aim of this study was to provide directly measured EE for several different activities in youth.

Methods:

Resting metabolic rate (RMR) of 178 youths (80 females, 98 males) was first measured. Participants then performed structured activity bouts while wearing a portable metabolic system to directly measure EE. Steady-state oxygen consumption data were used to compute activity METstandard (activity VO2/3.5) and METmeasured (activity VO2/measured RMR) for the different activities.

Results:

Rates of EE were measured for 70 different activities and ranged from 1.9 to 12.0 METstandard and 1.5 to 10.0 METmeasured.

Conclusion:

This study provides directly measured energy cost values for 70 activities in children and adolescents. It contributes empirical data to support the expansion of the Compendium of Energy Expenditures for Youth.

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Louise C. Mâsse and Judith E. de Niet

Background:

Over the years, self-report measures of physical activity (PA) have been employed in applications for which their use was not supported by the validity evidence.

Methods:

To address this concern this paper 1) provided an overview of the sources of validity evidence that can be assessed with self-report measures of PA, 2) discussed the validity evidence needed to support the use of self-report in certain applications, and 3) conducted a case review of the 7-day PA Recall (7-d PAR).

Results:

This paper discussed 5 sources of validity evidence, those based on: test content; response processes; behavioral stability; relations with other variables; and sensitivity to change. The evidence needed to use self-report measures of PA in epidemiological, surveillance, and intervention studies was presented. These concepts were applied to a case review of the 7-d PAR. The review highlighted the utility of the 7-d PAR to produce valid rankings. Initial support, albeit weaker, for using the 7-d PAR to detect relative change in PA behavior was found.

Conclusion:

Overall, self-report measures can validly rank PA behavior but they cannot adequately quantify PA. There is a need to improve the accuracy of self-report measures of PA to provide unbiased estimates of PA.

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Richard P. Troiano, Kelley K. Pettee Gabriel, Gregory J. Welk, Neville Owen and Barbara Sternfeld

Context:

Advances in device-based measures have led researchers to question the value of reported measures of physical activity or sedentary behavior. The premise of the Workshop on Measurement of Active and Sedentary Behaviors: Closing the Gaps in Self-Report Methods, held in July 2010, was that assessment of behavior by self-report is a valuable approach.

Objective:

To provide suggestions to optimize the value of reported physical activity and sedentary behavior, we 1) discuss the constructs that devices and reports of behavior can measure, 2) develop a framework to help guide decision-making about the best approach to physical activity and sedentary behavior assessment in a given situation, and 3) address the potential for combining reported behavior methods with device-based monitoring to enhance both approaches.

Process:

After participation in a workshop breakout session, coauthors summarized the ideas presented and reached consensus on the material presented here.

Conclusions:

To select appropriate physical activity assessment methods and correctly interpret the measures obtained, researchers should carefully consider the purpose for assessment, physical activity constructs of interest, characteristics of the population and measurement tool, and the theoretical link between the exposure and outcome of interest.

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Amanda L. Penko, Jacob E. Barkley, Anson B. Rosenfeldt and Jay L. Alberts

Physical Activity Assessment Parkinson’s disease motor symptoms, fall frequency, and physical activity assessments were completed at 3 time points: baseline (ie, 1 wk preceding the intervention); postintervention (ie, within 1 wk following intervention); and 4-week postintervention. For PD motor symptoms

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Jordan Andre Martenstyn, Lauren Powell, Natasha Nassar, Mark Hamer and Emmanuel Stamatakis

, lifestyle-embedded activity and sleep: new frontiers in physical activity assessment . Can J Public Health . 2007 ; 98 ( suppl 2 ): S208 – S217 . 18213950

Open access

Jairo H. Migueles, Alex V. Rowlands, Florian Huber, Séverine Sabia and Vincent T. van Hees

accelerometer data for free-living physical activity assessment using local gravity and temperature: An evaluation on four continents . Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), 117 ( 7 ), 738 – 744 . PubMed ID: 26806874 doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00421.2014 10.1152/japplphysiol.00421.2014 van Hees

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Wojtek Chodzko-Zajko, Erica M. Taylor and T. Gilmour Reeve

. Evaluate the quality of her or his own practice of physical activity. Assessment Procedures and the Core Content For the listed learning outcomes, several points need to be emphasized. First, these statements may be more generic that what an actual program would use. That is, what the student is expected

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Erin Strutz, Raymond Browning, Stephanie Smith, Barbara Lohse and Leslie Cunningham-Sabo

. PubMed doi:10.1186/s13104-014-0970-2 25595702 10.1186/s13104-014-0970-2 20. Baquet G , Stratton G , Van Praagh E , Berthoin S . Improving physical activity assessment in prepubertal children with high-frequency accelerometry monitoring: a methodological issue . Prev Med . 2007 ; 44 ( 2

Open access

Levi Frehlich, Christine Friedenreich, Alberto Nettel-Aguirre, Jasper Schipperijn and Gavin R. McCormack

, R.P. , Bowles , H.R. , Rood , J. , . . . Bassett , D.R. ( 2017 ). Physical activity assessment with the ActiGraph GT3X and doubly labeled water . Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 49 ( 9 ), 1935 – 1944 . PubMed ID: 28419028 doi:10.1249/MSS.0000000000001299 10.1249/MSS