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Anna Lina Rahlf, Klaus-Michael Braumann and Astrid Zech

control . Int J Sports Phys Ther . 2013 ; 8 ( 4 ): 393 – 406 . PubMed ID: 24175126 24175126 16. Nunes GS , de Noronha M , Cunha HS , Ruschel C , Borges NG Jr . Effect of kinesio taping on jumping and balance in athletes: a crossover randomized controlled trial . J Strength Cond Res

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TaeYeong Kim, JaeHyuk Lee, SeJun Oh, Seungmin Kim and BumChul Yoon

AM , Salvesen Ø , Vasseljen O . Motor control exercises, sling exercises, and general exercises for patients with chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial with 1-year follow-up . Phys Ther . 2010 ; 90 : 1426 – 1440 . doi:10.2522/ptj.20090421 20671099 10.2522/ptj.20090421 21. Kim

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Kevin Laudner and Kyle Thorson

Context: Tightness of the pectoralis minor is a common characteristic that has been associated with aberrant posture and shoulder pathology. Determining conservative treatment techniques for maintaining and lengthening this muscle is critical. Although some gross stretching techniques have been proven effective, there are currently no empirical data regarding the effectiveness of self-myofascial release for treating tightness of this muscle. Objective: To determine the acute effectiveness of a self-myofascial release with movement technique of the pectoralis minor for improving shoulder motion and posture among asymptomatic individuals. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Orthopedic rehabilitation clinic. Participants: A total of 21 physically active, college-aged individuals without shoulder pain volunteered to participate in this study. Main Outcome Measures: Glenohumeral internal rotation, external rotation, and flexion range of motion (ROM), pectoralis minor length, and forward scapular posture were measured in all participants. The intervention group received one application of a self-soft-tissue mobilization of the pectoralis minor with movement. The placebo group completed the same motions as the intervention group, but with minimal pressure applied to the xiphoid process. Separate analyses of covariance were used to determine differences between groups (P < .05). Results: Separate analyses of covariance showed that the self-mobilization group had significantly more flexion ROM, pectoralis minor length, and less forward scapular posture posttest than the placebo group. However, the difference in forward scapular posture may not be clinically significant. No differences were found between groups for external or internal rotation ROM. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that an acute self-myofascial release with movement is effective for improving glenohumeral flexion ROM and pectoralis minor length, and may assist with forward scapular posture. Clinicians should consider this self-mobilization in the prevention and rehabilitation of pathologies associated with shortness of the pectoralis minor.

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Julie A. Fuller, Heidi L. Hammil, Kelly J. Pronschinske and Chris J. Durall

dislocation in adolescents. • The search yielded 2 level II randomized controlled trials 2 , 3 and 1 level III nonrandomized study 1 that directly compared patellar redislocation rate, knee function, and patellofemoral pain between the 2 treatment approaches. • In 2 of the 3 reviewed studies, the authors

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Lauren Anne Lipker, Caitlyn Rae Persinger, Bradley Steven Michalko and Christopher J. Durall

Abbreviations: ACLR, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction; BFR, blood flow restriction; CSA, cross-sectional area; F, female; IKDC, International Knee Documentation Committee; M, male; RCT, randomized control trial; MRI, magnetic resonance imaging; T1, T1 weighted MRI imaging. Best Evidence The studies

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Steven Nagib and Shelley W. Linens

after suffering a concussion caused by sport or a direct blow to the head. • Three studies were included: 1 randomized control trial, 1 exploratory study, and 1 retrospective chart review. • All 3 studies support the use of VRT to treat postconcussion dizziness. • All 3 studies included used Dizziness

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Nicholas Hattrup, Hannah Gray, Mark Krumholtz and Tamara C. Valovich McLeod

stage of recovery. • The literature search returned 12 studies related to the clinical question; 5 studies met the inclusion criteria. • One study was a randomized controlled trial showing aerobic exercise compared to a stretching routine resulted in a 2-day decrease in symptoms. 14 • One article 15

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Erica M. Willadsen, Andrea B. Zahn and Chris J. Durall

determine the most effective training paradigm for reducing noncontact ACL injury risk. • The search generated 2 level 1b randomized control trials (RCTs) and 1 level 2b cohort study. These studies examined the effects of plyometric exercise, balance training, core stabilization training, and neuromuscular

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Hiroshi Takasaki, Yu Okubo and Shun Okuyama

criteria were used: (1) assessment of the JPS; (2) peer-reviewed original studies with a randomized controlled trial or quasi-randomized controlled trial design; (3) participants with musculoskeletal disorders or healthy individuals (ie, neither animal studies nor those involving neurological problems

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Erik A. Wikstrom, Sajad Bagherian, Nicole B. Cordero and Kyeongtak Song

was searched for studies of level 2 evidence or higher, which investigated the effect of anterior-to-posterior ankle joint mobilization on patient-reported outcomes in patients with CAI. • Three studies were included: 2 randomized controlled trials 6 , 8 and 1 prospective cohort study. 7 Two studies