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Kari Stefansen, Gerd Marie Solstad, Åse Strandbu and Maria Hansen

In this paper, we explore coach-athlete sexual relationships (CASRs) from the perspective of young athletes, with the aim of adding to the evolving research on CASRs as a contested social phenomenon. Our starting point is what we see as two conflicting images of such relationships in contemporary

Open access

Viviene A. Temple, Dawn L. Lefebvre, Stephanie C. Field, Jeff R. Crane, Beverly Smith and Patti-Jean Naylor

relationships between motor development and physical activity engagement was central to the development of Stodden and colleagues’ ( 2008 ) conceptual model. The model illustrates a developmentally dynamic and reciprocal relationship between motor skill competence and physical activity; where fundamental motor

Open access

Madhura Phansikar and Sean P. Mullen

/relatives, places of recreation ( Smith & Sylvestre, 2001 ); and malls, cafes, and restaurants ( Chudyk et al., 2015 ; Michael et al., 2006 ). Research has shown that active travel is beneficial for physical health. For example, Vancampfort et al. ( 2018 ) examined the relationship between active travel and

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Pier Paolo Mariani, Luca Laudani, Jacopo E. Rocchi, Arrigo Giombini and Andrea Macaluso

specific time requirements as to when surgery can be performed. Nevertheless, the relationship between preoperative and postoperative quadriceps strength is more uncertain 10 when the quadriceps strength is evaluated 3 months after surgery. In addition, most of the previous studies were carried out in

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Pier Paolo Mariani, Luca Laudani, Jacopo E. Rocchi, Arrigo Giombini and Andrea Macaluso

specific time requirements as to when surgery can be performed. Nevertheless, the relationship between preoperative and postoperative quadriceps strength is more uncertain 10 when the quadriceps strength is evaluated 3 months after surgery. In addition, most of the previous studies were carried out in

Open access

Brad W. Willis, Katie Hocker, Swithin Razu, Aaron D. Gray, Marjorie Skubic, Seth L. Sherman, Samantha Kurkowski and Trent M. Guess

-extremity measure defined as the frontal plane distance between the knee joint centers divided by the frontal plane distance between the ankle joint centers, has been suggested. 5 , 6 Mizner et al 5 highlighted the KASR as a potential surrogate to KAA, but demonstrated only a weak to moderate relationship ( r 2

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Kenneth Färnqvist, Stephen Pearson and Peter Malliaras

not clear whether these adaptations occur in tendinopathy and if so whether they are associated with improved clinical outcomes. A prior systematic review 9 did not support a relationship between observable structural change (MRI and ultrasound) and improved clinical outcomes when treated by

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Kyle Davis, Stephen Rossi, Jody Langdon and Jim McMillan

The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the relationship between jumping and sprinting among members of a regionally competitive club-level ultimate team. Twenty-two subjects (mean ± SD; 21.1±2.26 year) volunteered to participate in two testing sessions the week before the team’s regional tournament. Testing sessions included body-composition measurement, a 40-yard sprint (with a 10-yard split time recorded), a standing long jump (LJ) and a vertical jump (VJ). Pearson product-moment correlations revealed a significant negative correlation between LJ and 40-yard sprint time. Significant positive relationships were observed between VJ height and 10-yard power, VJ power and 10-yard power, VJ power and relative 10-yard power, relative VJ power and relative 10-yard power, BJ distance and 10-yard power, VJ height and 40-yard power, VJ power and 40-yard power, and relative VJ power and relative 40-yard power. BJ distance related significantly to 40-yard velocity, 40-yard power and 40-yard relative power. There appears to be a relationship between jumping ability and sprinting in this population, but more studies with this population are needed to confirm these results.

Open access

Amy R. Barchek, Shelby E. Baez, Matthew C. Hoch and Johanna M. Hoch

et al 6 Hubbard-Turner et al 8 Kuenze et al 7 Glaviano et al 5 Study title Objectively measured physical activity in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction Physical activity levels in college students with chronic ankle instability Relationship between physical activity and clinical

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Lawrence Frank, Jacqueline Kerr, Dori Rosenberg and Abby King

Background:

Suburban development patterns may impede physical activity (PA) and mobility and affect healthy aging. This paper investigates the relationships between neighborhood design and walking, driving, PA, and obesity in adults over age 65 years.

Methods:

Data from the SMARTRAQ (Atlanta region) survey provided measures of PA, BMI, SES, and travel patterns. Neighborhood design was measured using a walkability index (residential density, street connectivity, retail density, and land use mix). Chi square and regression was used to evaluate relationships.

Results:

Increased walkability was related with more walking (OR 2.02), less time spent traveling in a car (OR .53), and lower odds of being overweight (OR .68). Those with 1 or no cars were more likely to walk (OR 2.9) and spend less time in cars (OR .53); but also less likely to get recommended levels of PA (OR .55). Visiting a fast food outlet was associated with increased odds of obesity (OR 1.81).

Conclusions:

Policies are needed to bring older Americans closer to shops and services and healthy food outlets as a means of encouraging regular walking and healthy body weight. Incentives to encourage neighborhood grocery stores and affordable housing in central areas along with regulatory reform through zoning can encourage PA and healthy body weight in the elderly.