Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 29 items for :

  • "return-to-play" x
  • User-accessible content x
Clear All
Free access

Nicole Cascia, Tim L. Uhl and Carolyn M. Hettrich

Clinical Scenario Numerous studies have reported on postoperative return to play (RTP) rates, between 66% and 98%, in professional baseball players after ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction. 1 – 5 Currently, there is limited evidence following nonoperative management. There has been an

Open access

Christie Powell, Jody Jensen and Samantha Johnson

injury, many athletes are not fully recovered and return to play prematurely. Common intrinsic risk factors for lower-extremity injuries are previous injury in the same body region and compromised function. 3 , 6 Previously injured athletes often lack the neuromuscular control, balance, proprioception

Open access

Corey P. Ochs, Melissa C. Kay and Johna K. Register-Mihalik

exposures in football 1 to 1.55/1000 athlete exposures in ice hockey. 2 Professional sports leagues, such as the National Football League (NFL) and National Hockey League (NHL), have instituted policies to assess and manage concussions, including return to play; however, little is known about the

Free access

Sergio Jiménez-Rubio, Archit Navandar, Jesús Rivilla-García and Victor Paredes-Hernández

forcing an early return to play. 25 This implies that although the previously mentioned protocols, programs, and exercises have shown to be effective with the general athletic population, there appears to be a need for a soccer-specific rehabilitation program. Such a program must have loads and movement

Full access

Jenny H. Conviser, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney and Riley Nickols

and recovery status and, as such, ongoing re-evaluation by the MDTT during treatment is necessary. It is critical that the MDTT agree upon previously established parameters for return to play ( Cook et al., 2016 ) since a premature return to sport may increase risk of aggravated illness, injury or re

Open access

Matt Hausmann, Jacob Ober and Adam S. Lepley

Clinical Scenario Ankle sprains are the most prevalent athletic-related musculoskeletal injury treated by athletic trainers, often affecting activities of daily living and delaying return to play. 1 Most of these cases present with pain and swelling in the ankle, resulting in decreased range of

Open access

Martin Buchheit and Ben Michael Simpson

With the ongoing development of microtechnology, player tracking has become one of the most important components of load monitoring in team sports. The 3 main objectives of player tracking are better understanding of practice (provide an objective, a posteriori evaluation of external load and locomotor demands of any given session or match), optimization of training-load patterns at the team level, and decision making on individual players’ training programs to improve performance and prevent injuries (eg, top-up training vs unloading sequences, return to play progression). This paper discusses the basics of a simple tracking approach and the need to integrate multiple systems. The limitations of some of the most used variables in the field (including metabolic-power measures) are debated, and innovative and potentially new powerful variables are presented. The foundations of a successful player-monitoring system are probably laid on the pitch first, in the way practitioners collect their own tracking data, given the limitations of each variable, and how they report and use all this information, rather than in the technology and the variables per se. Overall, the decision to use any tracking technology or new variable should always be considered with a cost/benefit approach (ie, cost, ease of use, portability, manpower/ability to affect the training program).

Open access

Mark Stanbrough

Coaches play an extremely valuable role in a profession that offers the opportunity to help develop young people. The purpose of this study, which assessed the state of coaching education, was two-fold: 1) to determine coaching education knowledge and skills in meeting the National Coaching Standards, and 2) to determine the application of effective coaching principles in meeting the National Coaching Standards. An email containing a website link for an online survey was sent to all athletic directors in Kansas middle and high schools asking them to forward the website link to all coaches they worked with. A total of 1,414 surveys were returned. The current state of coaching education assessment listed the national coaching standards developed by NASPE and used a Likert scale to ask how prepared and successful the coaches are in meeting the standard. Results of the survey indicated that coaches feel highly prepared and successful in the following coaching standard topics: teaching positive behavior (Standard 2), demonstrating ethical conduct (Standard 4), environmental conditions (Standard 7), positive learning environments (Standard 19), and skills of the sport (standard 27). Coaches indicated that they felt least prepared and least successful in the following standards: coordinated health care program (Standard 10), psychological implications (Standard 11), conditioning based on exercise physiology (Standard 12), teaching proper nutrition (Standard 13), conditioning to return to play after injury (Standard 15), mental skill training (Standard 24), managing human resources (Standard 32), managing fiscal resources (Standard 33) and emergency action plans (Standard 34). Findings from the study can be used to direct coaching education in the areas coaches feel they are less prepared and less successful.

Open access

Mary Lynn Manduca and Stephen J. Straub

treatment or rehabilitation program alone • O utcomes: return to play (recovery time duration) Sources of Evidence Searched PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, ScienceDirect, and SagePub were all searched using keywords PRP injection, hamstring, and hamstring injury. Additional resources were

Open access

Nathan Millikan, Dustin R. Grooms, Brett Hoffman and Janet E. Simon

musculoskeletal injury is exponentially higher after a primary injury, highlighting the need for functional testing to determine injury recovery and return to play readiness to mitigate the high reinjury risk. 4 Functional testing comes in numerous forms. Lower-extremity functional testing has focused on agility