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Michelle C. Kegler, Iris Alcantara, Regine Haardörfer, Alexandra Gemma, Denise Ballard and Julie Gazmararian

Background:

Physical activity levels, including walking, are lower in the southern U.S., particularly in rural areas. This study investigated the concept of rural neighborhood walkability to aid in developing tools for assessing walkability and to identify intervention targets in rural communities.

Methods:

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with physically active adults (n = 29) in rural Georgia. Mean age of participants was 55.9 years; 66% were male, 76% were white, and 24% were African American. Participants drew maps of their neighborhoods and discussed the relevance of typical domains of walkability to their decisions to exercise. Comparative analyses were conducted to identify major themes.

Results:

The majority felt the concept of neighborhood was applicable and viewed their neighborhood as small geographically (less than 0.5 square miles). Sidewalks were not viewed as essential for neighborhood-based physical activity and typical destinations for walking were largely absent. Destinations within walking distance included neighbors’ homes and bodies of water. Views were mixed on whether shade, safety, dogs, and aesthetics affected decisions to exercise in their neighborhoods.

Conclusions:

Measures of neighborhood walkability in rural areas should acknowledge the small size of self-defined neighborhoods, that walking in rural areas is likely for leisure time exercise, and that some domains may not be relevant.

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Nisha Botchwey, Myron F. Floyd, Keshia Pollack Porter, Carmen L. Cutter, Chad Spoon, Tom L. Schmid, Terry L. Conway, J. Aaron Hipp, Anna J. Kim, M. Renee Umstattd Meyer, Amanda L. Walker, Tina J. Kauh and Jim F. Sallis

understudied groups at higher risk of physical inactivity and obesity, including youth of minority ethnic and racial groups and all ethnic and racial groups living in rural areas. Third, the research agenda would focus on a limited number of topic areas that are promising but understudied, within categories

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António Prista, Timoteo Daca, Francisco Tchonga, Eduardo Machava, Cremildo Macucule and Edmundo Ribeiro

Background:

This article describes the procedures and development of the 2016 Mozambican Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Adolescents.

Methods:

Following the procedures adopted in 2014 for that year’s report card, comprehensive searches on new data related to indicators of physical activity (PA) were done. A committee composed of physical activity and sports specialists graded each indicator consistent with the process and methodology outlined by the Active Healthy Kids Canada Report Card model.

Results:

Nine indicators of PA were graded. Compared with 2014 there were several differences which were caused by changes in the country as well as a more effective evaluation from the committee. The following grades were assigned: Overall Physical Activity Levels, C; Organized Sport Participation, F; Active Play, D; Active Transportation, C; Schools, D; Community and the Built Environment, F; and Government, F. Sedentary Behaviors and Family and Peers were graded Incomplete due to the lack of available information.

Conclusions:

The decline of the PA habits in urban centers reported in 2014 are accentuated and is influencing the rural areas in several ways. At present, there is no strategy or effective action from authorities to reverse this negative trend.

Open access

Chalchisa Abdeta, Zelalem Teklemariam, Alem Deksisa and Endashew Abera

children and youth (17% urban & 39% rural) meet 60 minutes moderate physical activity every day. Organized Sport Participation C Almost 50% of children and youth are participating in school athletics, handball, volleyball and football competitions at all levels for several times in a year. Active Play B

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Jasmin Bhawra, Priyanka Chopra, Ranjani Harish, Anjana Mohan, Krishnaveni V. Ghattu, Kumaran Kalyanaraman and Tarun R. Katapally

youth in India. Figure 1 —India’s 2018 Report Card cover. Table 1 Grades and Rationales for India’s 2018 Report Card Indicators Grades Rationale Overall Physical Activity D Approximately 25% of children and youth accumulate ≥ 60 minutes of MVPA daily. It is expected that children and youth from rural

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Dawn M. Tladi, Malebogo Monnaatsie, Sheila Shaibu, Gaonyadiwe Sinombe, Gaonyadiwe G. Mokone, Lesego Gabaitiri, Leapetswe Malete and Hubona Omphile

expert opinion. Approximately 20% of the children play actively, mostly children living in rural areas. No empirical evidence is available that addresses active play, let alone the specifics of active play (e.g., frequency, duration, type). Active Transportation C 49% of 13-15 year olds show that they

Open access

Taru Manyanga, Nyaradzai E. Munambah, Carol B. Mahachi, Daga Makaza, Tholumusa F. Mlalazi, Vincent Masocha, Paul Makoni, Fortunate Sithole, Bhekuzulu Khumalo, Sipho H. Rutsate and Tonderayi M. Matsungo

there was some variation between boys and girls as well as between rural and urban areas. The proportion of boys walking to and from school was lower (79%) compared with girls (82%). Use of active transport was lower (78%) among urban and higher (88%) among rural school children and youth. Sedentary

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Vida K. Nyawornota, Austin Luguterah, Seidu Sofo, Richmond Aryeetey, Margaret Badasu, John Nartey, Emmanuel Assasie, Samuel K. Donkor, Vivian Dougblor, Helena Williams and Reginald Ocansey

-based activities at school, home and in open spaces around the 216 districts in the country. Active Transportation C+ About 54% of children and youth, especially those in the rural areas, walk to school and back home covering about 2km. Sedentary Behaviours INC There was no data to describe children and youth

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Kingsley K. Akinroye and Ade F. Adeniyi

children and youth in urban population and 43.7% in rural areas participate in organized sports. It was also found that 40% of children in public schools and 80% in private schools engage in organized sports that involved football, table tennis and athletics. The gradual incursion of Sport Academies has

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Ricky Camplain, Julie A. Baldwin, Meghan Warren, Carolyn Camplain, Monica R. Lininger and Robert T. Trotter

intervention. Between October 2017 and April 2018, we interviewed 199 individuals ≥18 years of age who were housed at a rural county jail to assess their general health status and their physical activity participation during recreation time. 4 Briefly, participants were asked about their frequency of