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Kelly P. Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Viviane Grassmann, Krystn Orr, Amy C. McPherson, Guy E. Faulkner and F. Virginia Wright

, after which two meetings and a series of online discussions were held to discuss the results. Based on these group discussions, the main outcomes of the included studies were categorized into four key areas of associated impact—social skills and relationships, physical skill development, psychological

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Tiffanye M. Vargas-Tonsing, Margaret Flores and Robbi Beyer

The prevalence of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is between 2%-10% of children (Center for Disease Control, 2003). Participation in organized sports is beneficial to children with ADHD by increasing self-esteem, self-efficacy, peer acceptance, and social skills (Armstrong & Drabman, 2004; Bagwell, Brooke, Pelham, and Hoza, 2001). Little research exists as to preparation for youth sport coaches with regard to coaching athletes with ADHD. The study’s purpose was to investigate coaches’ efficacy beliefs for coaching athletes with ADHD. Two hundred nineteen volunteer coaches completed a questionnaire designed to measure their beliefs. The results showed that overall coaches reported fairly high feelings of efficacy for working with athletes with ADHD. However, results also indicated that coaches reporting experience with athletes with ADHD reported higher efficacy for coaching athletes with ADHD than their less experienced peers. Implications for coaching education include the incorporation of behavior management techniques into course content and the creation of ADHD resources such as weblinks and pamphlets.

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Carlos Capella-Peris, Jesús Gil-Gómez and Òscar Chiva-Bartoll

school and learning, civic engagement, social skills, and academic performance ( White, 2001 ). When training PTs, SL produced personal, social, and professional development; emotional engagement and cognitive readiness with the community; and increased evaluation skills ( Chambers & Lavery, 2012

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Alan L. Smith and Daniel Gould

, health, and well-being, and social influence, respectively. It is important to state, however, that these organizational groupings are not mutually exclusive. Matters surrounding sport as a context for development of motivation, performance, and social skills, for example, are salient to health and well

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Viviene A. Temple, Dawn L. Lefebvre, Stephanie C. Field, Jeff R. Crane, Beverly Smith and Patti-Jean Naylor

types of activities (Recreational, Physical, Social, Skill-Based, Self-Improvement) of children in more and less vulnerable schools, with age in months as a covariate. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the gross motor quotients of children attending the more and less vulnerable schools

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George B. Cunningham, Erin Buzuvis and Chris Mosier

and adolescents spend most of their time in schools, these schools play an important role in individuals’ well-being and development of peer relationships ( Wentzel & Caldwell, 1997 ). As Morrow ( 2004 ) commented, schools represent “the primary social setting in which friends are made, social skills

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Maureen R. Weiss, Lindsay E. Kipp, Alison Phillips Reichter, Sarah M. Espinoza and Nicole D. Bolter

social skills • Acting nicer • Encourages teammates • More social • Peer interactions • More friendly • Communicates better • Encourages other kids • More outgoing • More inclusive of others • More comfortable with peers • Shows greater respect • More responsible • Leadership skills Developing positive