Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 21 items for :

  • "sport medicine" x
  • User-accessible content x
Clear All
Open access

Daniel Martínez-Silván, Jaime Díaz-Ocejo and Andrew Murray

Purpose:

To analyze the influence of training exposure and the utility of self-report questionnaires on predicting overuse injuries in adolescent endurance athletes.

Methods:

Five adolescent male endurance athletes (15.7 ± 1.4 y) from a full-time sports academy answered 2 questionnaires (Recovery Cue; RC-q and Oslo Sports Trauma Research questionnaire; OSTRC-q) on a weekly basis for 1 season (37 wk) to detect signs of overtraining and underrecovery (RC-q) and early symptoms of lower-limb injuries (OSTRC-q). All overuse injuries were retrospectively analyzed to detect which variations in the questionnaires in the weeks preceding injury were best associated. Overuse incidence rates were calculated based on training exposure.

Results:

Lower-limb overuse injuries accounted for 73% of total injuries. The incidence rate for overuse training-related injuries was 10 injuries/1000 h. Strong correlations were observed between individual running exposure and overuse injury incidence (r 2 = .66), number of overuse injuries (r 2 = .69), and days lost (r 2 = .66). A change of 20% or more in the RC-q score in the preceding week was associated with 67% of the lower-limb overuse injuries. Musculoskeletal symptoms were only detected in advance by the OSTRC-q in 27% of the episodes.

Conclusion:

Training exposure (especially running exposure) was shown to be related to overuse injuries, suggesting that monitoring training load is a key factor for injury prevention. Worsening scores in the RC-q (but not the OSTRC) may be an indicator of overuse injury in adolescent endurance runners when used longitudinally.

Open access

Steven Nagib and Shelley W. Linens

Clinical Scenario: Every year, millions of people suffer a concussion. A significant portion of these people experience symptoms lasting longer than 10 days and are diagnosed with postconcussion syndrome. Dizziness is the second most reported symptom associated with a concussion and may be a predictor of prolonged recovery. Clinicians are beginning to incorporate vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) in their postconcussion treatment plan, in order to address the dysfunctional inner ear structures that could be causing this dizziness. Focused Clinical Question: Can VRT help postconcussion syndrome patients experiencing prolonged dizziness by improving their perceived disability? Summary of Key Findings: Three studies were included: 1 randomized control trial, 1 retrospective chart review, and 1 exploratory study. The randomized control trial compared cervical spine therapy alone to cervical spine therapy in conjunction with VRT to obtain medical clearance for sport. The chart review explored VRT as a treatment for reducing dizziness and improving balance and gait dysfunction. The exploratory study implemented VRT in conjunction with light aerobic exercise to improve perceived disability associated with dizziness postconcussion. All 3 studies found statistically significant decreases (improvements) in Dizziness Handicap Index scores. Clinical Bottom Line: There is preliminary evidence suggesting that VRT can improve perceived disability in patients with postconcussion syndrome experiencing prolonged dizziness. There is a decrease (improvement) in Dizziness Handicap Index scores across all 3 studies. VRT is a relatively safe treatment option, with no adverse reactions or case reports. Strength of Recommendation: There is level 2 and level 3 evidence supporting the use of VRT to treat patients suffering from dizziness postconcussion.

Open access

Mary Lynn Manduca and Stephen J. Straub

Clinical Scenario: Hamstring strains are common athletic injuries, with a high-recurrence rate (34%). Recently, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections have gained popularity as a potential treatment option to accelerate healing of hamstring injury. Focused Clinical Question: Does the combination of PRP injection and rehabilitation decrease recovery time of acute hamstring injury as compared to rehabilitation alone in college athletes? Summary of Key Findings: A literature search resulted in 3 randomized controlled trials. One study showed benefits in various outcome measures with PRP, compared to rehabilitation alone, while 2 showed no benefits. One study reported improved pain, ultrasonography regenerative indications, and recovery time with PRP injection following acute hamstring injury; however, larger studies have shown no benefits. The literature demonstrates conflicting evidence regarding benefits of PRP injections in hamstring injuries. Clinical Bottom Line: At this time, PRP injections cannot be recommended as having value for hamstring injuries, compared to rehabilitation alone. Strength of Recommendation: Due to inconsistent or limited quality patient-oriented evidence in existing literature, the strength of this recommendation is grade B, based on the strength of recommendation taxonomy.

Open access

Robert Rodriguez

Clinical Scenario: Ice hockey and soccer are both dynamic sports that involve continuous, unpredictable play. These athletes consistently demonstrate higher rates of groin strains compared with other contact sports. Measuring the hip adductor/abductor ratio has the potential to expose at-risk players, reduce injury rates, and preserve groin health in players with chronic strains. Focused Clinical Question: What is the clinical utility of measuring the hip adductor/abductor ratio for preseason and in-season ice hockey and soccer players? Summary of Key Findings: Three studies, all of which were prospective cohort designs, were included. One study involved assessing preseason strength and flexibility as a risk factor for adductor strains in professional ice hockey players. Another study performed with the same professional hockey team used preseason hip adductor/abductor strength ratios to screen for those players who would benefit from a strengthening intervention aimed at reducing the incidence of adductor strains. The final study, which was performed in elite U17 soccer players, assessed the effectiveness of monthly in-season strength monitoring as a guide to trigger in-season interventions to decrease injury incidence. Clinical Bottom Line: Measuring the hip adductor/abductor strength ratio in hockey and soccer players can be a beneficial preseason and in-season tool to predict future groin strain risk and screen for athletes who might benefit from a strengthening intervention. Strength of Recommendation: Level 3 evidence exists to support monitoring the hip adductor/abductor strength ratio to assess and reduce the risk of adductor strains in ice hockey and soccer players.

Open access

Izzeldin Ibrahim, Eiman Al Hammadi, Suzan Sayegh, Lena Zimmo, Jwaher Al Neama, Husam Rezeq, Abdulla Saeed Al-Mohannadi and Al Anoud Al-Thani

Card Leadership (RCL) Team was established at Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sport Medicine Hospital, in collaboration with Stakeholder Group (SG) including members from well-established governmental and academic institutions in Qatar: Ministry of Public Health, Ministry of Education and Higher Education, and

Full access

Monna Arvinen-Barrow, Nathan Maresh and Jennifer Earl-Boehm

higher 20 and faster 23 rate of returning to sport following athletic injury. From an injured athletes’ perspective, research findings suggest that sport medicine professionals (ie, athletic trainers, physiotherapists) who work with injured athletes during rehabilitation (a social/contextual factor

Open access

Ina Garthe and Ronald J. Maughan

Olympics . Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, 13 ( 1 ), 33 – 40 . PubMed doi:10.1097/00042752-200301000-00007 10.1097/00042752-200301000-00007 CRN Consumer Survey on Dietary Supplements . ( 2015 ). Retrieved from https://www.crnusa.org/CRNconsumersurvey/2015/ CRN Consumer Survey on Dietary

Open access

Anna K. Melin, Ida A. Heikura, Adam Tenforde and Margo Mountjoy

; Sygo et al., 2019 ). The treatment often requires a collaborative team approach including a sport medicine physician, a trained sports dietitian, and a sport physiologist experienced in safe body composition management. If EDs/DE is part of the clinical presentation, inclusion of psychologist

Full access

Jenny H. Conviser, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney and Riley Nickols

.1080/02640414.2011.565783 Sundgot-Borgen , J. , & Torstveit , M.K. ( 2004 ). Prevalence of eating disorders in elite athletes is higher than in the general population . Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, 14 , 25 – 32 . PubMed doi:10.1097/00042752-200401000-00005 10.1097/00042752-200401000-00005 Torres-McGehee , T

Open access

Keith Baar

, he also participated in an average of three organized practices per week as well as a structured strength training program overseen by an elite strength and conditioning coach while being monitored by a rehabilitation specialist, physiotherapist, and sport medicine doctor. Stress Relaxation Loading