Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 35 items for :

  • "sport psychology" x
  • User-accessible content x
Clear All
Open access

Rebecca A. Zakrajsek and Sam J. Zizzi

This study examined: (1) coaches’ attitudes and readiness to use sport psychology (SP) services immediately following a SP workshop; and (2) the impact of an educational intervention on coaches’ attitudes and usage patterns during a one-month follow-up. Ninety swim coaches participated in the SP workshop and a total of 53 swim coaches completed the one-month follow-up. The majority of the sample coached at the high school or age group level. Data provided some evidence for the impact of a SP workshop on stage of change, with approximately 13% of coaches moving from precontemplation to contemplation. Two-way mixed ANOVAs did not reveal significant interactions (group × time) and main effects for time found that coaches’ personal openness, behavioral control, self-efficacy, and intentions increased while perceived barriers decreased immediately post-workshop. Furthermore, changes in coaches’ perceived barriers, behavioral control, and self-efficacy were maintained at the one-month follow-up while personal openness and intentions returned close to baseline. Lastly, no differences were found between the stage-matched and control group with regard to behavioral SP usage patterns (e.g., contacting a SP consultant, seeking out more information about SP). However, approximately 40% of coaches accessed the website during the four-week follow-up. The appropriateness of the transtheoretical model of behavior change applied to SP service use with coaches will be discussed.

Open access

Nathan A. Reis, Kent C. Kowalski, Amber D. Mosewich and Leah J. Ferguson

.1177/0891243205278639 10.1177/0891243205278639 Conroy , D.E. , Willow , J.P. , & Metzler , J.N. ( 2002 ). Multidimensional fear of failure measurement: The performance failure appraisal inventory . Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, 14 , 76 – 90 . doi:10.1080/10413200252907752 10

Open access

Nicholas Stanger and Susan H. Backhouse

Sport Journal, 3, 15 – 28 . doi:10.1123/ssj.3.1.15 10.1123/ssj.3.1.15 Erickson , K. , McKenna , J. , & Backhouse , S.H. ( 2015 ). A qualitative analysis of the factors that protect athletes against doping in sport . Psychology of Sport

Open access

Rosa M. Rodriguez, Ashley Marroquin and Nicole Cosby

Clinical Scenario: The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the major stabilizing ligaments of the knee joint by preventing anterior translation of the femur in the closed kinetic chain. A ruptured anterior cruciate ligament may require reconstructive surgery for patients who wish to return to physical activity. For the most part, surgeries are successful at repairing the ruptured ligament and restoring ligamentous function; the percentage of athletes that return to a competitive level of physical activity is only 44%, and 24% of patients report a main factor of preventing their return is fear of reinjury and pain. Most physiotherapy and rehabilitation research has focused on the physical treatment and is limited on the psychological aspects of recovery. Imagery has been suggested to be effective at reducing anxiety, tension, and pain, while promoting and encouraging healing after an injury. Imagery is defined as a process of performing a skill in one’s mind using the senses (touch, feel, smell, vision, etc) without any overt actions. Clinical Question: In athletes who are first-time anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction patients, does imagery training in combination with standard physical therapy reduce the fear of reinjury and pain perception? Summary of Key Findings: Previous research has primarily looked at the physical treatment aspect, and few studies have focused on the psychological factors affecting recovery. Researchers concluded that fear of reinjury was the unique predictor of return to sport even in a sample of participants that reported very little or almost no pain at all. Imagery as a therapy is an effective intervention in reducing fear of reinjury and confidence building. Furthermore, mental imagery is suggested to assist with a reduction in anxiety, pain, and tension, while promoting healing. Clinical Bottom Line: Based on the strength of recommendation taxonomy, there is a combination of level A and B evidence proposing that imagery, in combination with traditional physical therapy, can be effective at reducing psychological distress such as fear of reinjury and pain perception in first-time anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction patients.

Open access

Tobias Lundgren, Gustaf Reinebo, Markus Näslund and Thomas Parling

) with good results ( A-Tjak et al., 2015 ). Mindfulness and acceptance based interventions were soon adapted to athletic populations ( Gardner & Moore, 2004 ) and are growing in popularity in applied sport psychology. Three systematic reviews have examined the research of mindfulness and acceptance

Open access

Mitch Abrams and Michelle L. Bartlett

of the subspecialties of clinical psychology, sport psychology, and forensic psychology. This paper serves to provide an overview of context-specific approaches to pertinent identification and treatment issues. An overview of sexual abuse victim and perpetrator identification will be offered along

Full access

Kenneth Ravizza

Consulting issues that confront applied sport psychology personnel in gaining entry to working with athletic teams on a long-term basis are discussed. Barriers to entry are examined at the onset and it is emphasized that these obstacles must be overcome by all consultants. Strategies for overcoming such barriers include establishing respect and trust of key athletic personnel, gaining the head coach’s respect, knowing the sport, becoming knowledgeable of the coach’s orientation and team dynamics, gaining support at all levels of the organization, clarifying services to be provided, and making presentations to coaching staffs and athletes. Additional guidelines are discussed in an effort to better clarify the role of the applied sport psychology consultant. These include clarifying one’s own consulting needs, maintaining confidentiality, the need for open and honest communication, support demonstrated by coaches, and collecting research data while consulting.

Open access

Justine J. Reel and Emily Crouch

This year, the Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology ( JCSP ) reached a couple of milestones: earning an impact factor and celebrating its 12 th birthday. In December, the journal published a special issue on eating disorders in sport and exercise. At the Orlando JCSP editorial board meeting

Full access

Nick Wadsworth, Ben Paszkowec and Martin Eubank

experience of working in professional football together, where we would regularly discuss our philosophy of practice and development as applied practitioners. Ben and I had met while studying for a degree in sport psychology (MSc) and developed a strong personal and professional relationship. I would

Open access

Lori A. Gano-Overway

. , & Anders , A. ( 2019 ). Engaging with cultural sport psychology to explore systemic sexual exploitation in USA gymnastics: A call to commitments . Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, 1, 1 – 17 . doi:10.1080/10413200.2018.1564944 Fisher , L.A. ( 2020 ). Using the Larry Nassar case to create a