Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 23 items for :

  • Social Studies in Sport and Physical Activity x
  • User-accessible content x
Clear All
Open access

Jeremy Hapeta, Rochelle Stewart-Withers and Farah Palmer

This article seeks to make higher level contributions to the nexus between theory and practice within sport for social change by shining light on Indigenous theory and practice in Aotearoa New Zealand (NZ). First, we acknowledge the forward and timely thinking of this special issue for providing

Open access

Jon Welty Peachey, Nico Schulenkorf and Ramon Spaaij

Practice cannot be blind to theory, and theory cannot be blind to practice. This is simple to say yet immensely difficult to do. ( Morrison & van der Werf, 2012 , p. 400) Theory development around sport for social change agendas has received greater attention from scholars over the past 10 years

Full access

Amanda J. Visek, Heather Mannix, Avinash Chandran, Sean D. Cleary, Karen A. McDonnell and Loretta DiPietro

integration theory’s FUN MAPS ( Visek et al., 2015 ) offers a unique framework from which to conduct sex comparisons within the context of organized youth sport, and to further compare athletes on other binary categorizations germane to organized sport, such as age and level of competitive play. The Fun

Open access

Pirkko Markula

: Science focuses on studying reality and what can be directly observed or “experienced” by (human) senses is “real” ( Hacking, 1983 ). Following this foundation, positivism rejects causality, explanation, theory, or thought that interfere with the objectivity of direct observation ( Hacking, 1983

Open access

Joshua I. Newman

studies, indigenous studies, critical theory—and, based on the targeting of our journals as with these others— the sociology of sport . These fields, in the aggregate, were labelled by the hoaxers under the umbrella of “grievance studies.“ As one reporter who interviewed the fraudsters wrote: “Their goal

Open access

Nicole M. LaVoi, Jennifer E. McGarry and Leslee A. Fisher

), derived from Bronfenbrenner’s ecological systems theory, specifies that “human development and experience is influenced by a variety of proximally located individual, interpersonal, organizational, and socio-cultural environmental systems ” (emphasis added; p. 19) across one’s lifespan and career

Open access

Lori A. Gano-Overway

organizations to alter structures within sport to create a safe environment. Finally, Fisher ( 2020 ) guides readers in developing a pedagogical case study informed by feminist theory and a model in social work. By using media portrayals associated with the Nassar case, she demonstrates how coach educators can

Open access

Kari Stefansen, Gerd Marie Solstad, Åse Strandbu and Maria Hansen

specifically on Swidler’s ( 1986 ) idea of culture as a toolkit or repertoire “from which actors select differing pieces for constructing lines of action” (p. 277). In this theory, cultures are not understood as coherent systems but rather as containing diverse and often conflicting symbolic representations

Open access

Lori A. Gano-Overway

) examined sexual harassment among female sport management faculty, finding further support for some of the same themes but offering a new lens, institutional theory, by which to understand the themes. In another instance, Kane and Parks ( 1992 ) studied portrayals of professional tennis players in the media

Open access

Leslee A. Fisher

) described how Canada has handled leadership development of female coaches specifically through The Alberta Women in Sport Leadership Project. This intervention is based on social learning theory and is focused on both leadership development as well as gender equity. Alixandra Krahn ( 2019 ) explores how