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Jeremy Jordan, Aubrey Kent, Sonja Lilienthal, and Dan Mason

Edited by Carol A. Barr

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George B. Cunningham, Aubrey Kent, Dan Mason, and Anita Moorman

Edited by Carol A. Barr

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Jeremy Jordan, Aubrey Kent, Sonja Lilienthal, and Dan Mason

Edited by Carol A. Barr

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Aubrey Kent, Dan Mason, Anita Moorman, and Melanie L. Sartore

Edited by Carol A. Barr

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George B. Cunningham, Dan Mason, Aubrey Kent, and Anita Moorman

Edited by Carol A. Barr

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Yuhei Inoue, Jose M. Plehn-Dujowich, Aubrey Kent, and Steve Swanson

Despite the escalation of football coaches’ salaries at National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) institutions, little empirical investigation has been undertaken to identify the determinants of their compensation. As such, the purpose of this study is to explain how the level of coaching compensation is determined based on three theoretical perspectives in managerial compensation: marginal productivity theory, human capital theory, and managerialism. The analysis of compensation data of head football coaches at FBS institutions in 2006–2007 shows that the maximum total compensation of these coaches increases with their past performance. The results further reveal that coaches with greater human capital tend to receive a compensation package where bonuses account for a smaller proportion of the maximum total compensation. Overall, these findings mostly confirm the predictions drawn from managerial productivity theory, human capital theory and managerialism.

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George B. Cunningham, Michael Sagas, Marlene Dixon, Aubrey Kent, and Brian A. Turner

The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of internships on students’ career-related affect and intentions. Data were gathered from 138 upper-level undergraduate sport management students (71 interns, 67 noninterns). A doubly multivariate repeated measures model indicated that, although they did not differ at the beginning of the internship, interns had less positive attitudes toward the profession than did noninterns at the end of the internship. Structural equation modeling indicated that affective occupational commitment fully mediated the relationship between anticipated career satisfaction and intentions to enter the profession. The results contribute to the extant literature by demonstrating that internships can influence career-related affect and intentions.

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Jeremy Jordan, Aubrey Kent, Sonja Lilienthal, and Dan Mason

Edited by Carol A. Barr

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George B. Cunningham, Dan Mason, Aubrey Kent, and Anita Moorman

Edited by Carol A. Barr