Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 23 items for :

  • "other-efficacy" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Ben Jackson, Peter Knapp, and Mark R. Beauchamp

The purpose of the current study was to identify putative antecedents and consequences associated with self-efficacy, other-efficacy, and relation-inferred self-efficacy, within the context of elite coach-athlete dyads. Semistructured interviews were conducted with each member of six international-level coach-athlete partnerships, and data were analyzed using inductive and deductive content analytic techniques. Results for both athletes and coaches demonstrated that the above ‘tripartite efficacy beliefs’ (cf. Lent & Lopez, 2002) were identified as originating from perceptions regarding oneself, inferences regarding the ‘other’ dyad member (e.g., the athlete’s coach), as well as the dyad as a whole. Results also revealed that the tripartite efficacy constructs were interrelated, and independently associated with a number of positive task-related and relationship-oriented consequences. Findings are considered in relation to developing and sustaining effective coach-athlete relationships at the elite level.

Restricted access

Ben Jackson, Peter Knapp, and Mark R. Beauchamp

Drawing from Lent and Lopez’s (2002) “tripartite” model of relational efficacy, the overall purpose of this study was to examine antecedents and consequences of self-effcacy, other-efficacy, and relation-inferred self-efficacy (RISE) within six international-level athlete dyads. Semistructured interviews were conducted and data were content analyzed using deductive and inductive procedures. Sources of efficacy emerged in relation to perceptions regarding (i) oneself, (ii) one’s partner, (iii) the dyad/relationship, and (iv) external factors. Results also revealed the emergence of a number of salient intrapersonal and interpersonal outcomes, incorporating cognitive, affective, as well as behavioral consequences. Implications for theory development and future research are considered, and applied propositions are discussed with regard to effective relationship management in elite sport.

Restricted access

Ben Jackson, Daniel F. Gucciardi, Chris Lonsdale, Peter R. Whipp, and James A. Dimmock

Despite the prevalence of group-/team-based enactment within sport and physical activity settings, to this point the study of relation-inferred self-efficacy (RISE) has been focused upon estimations regarding a single target individual (e.g., one’s coach). Accordingly, researchers have not yet considered whether individuals may also form RISE estimations regarding the extent to which the others in their group/team as a whole are confident in their ability. We applied structural equation modeling analyses with cross-sectional and prospective data collected from members of interdependent sport teams (Studies 1 and 2) and undergraduate physical activity classes (Studies 3 and 4), with the purpose of exploring these group-focused RISE inferences. Analyses showed that group-focused RISE perceptions (a) predicted individuals’ confidence in their own ability, (b) were empirically distinct from conceptually related constructs, and (c) directly and/or indirectly predicted a range of downstream outcomes over and above the effects of other efficacy perceptions. Taken together, these findings provide preliminary evidence that individuals’ group-focused RISE appraisals may be important to consider when investigating the network of efficacy perceptions that develops in group-based physical activity contexts.

Restricted access

Grove * 8 2011 33 4 569 585 10.1123/jsep.33.4.569 Research Note Examining the Influence of Other-Efficacy and Self-Efficacy on Personal Performance William L. Dunlop * Daniel J. Beatty * Mark R. Beauchamp * 8 2011 33 4 586 593 10.1123/jsep.33.4.586 The Digest The Digest Meghan McDonough Anne

Restricted access

Anthony J. Amorose 2 6 2005 27 2 226 244 10.1123/jsep.27.2.226 Brief Report Self-Efficacy and Other-Efficacy in Dyadic Performance: Riding as One in Equestrian Eventing Mark R. Beauchamp * Lauren C. Whinton * 6 2005 27 2 245 252 10.1123/jsep.27.2.245 Research Further Examination of the Factor

Restricted access

Brock McMullen, Hester L. Henderson, Donna Harp Ziegenfuss, and Maria Newton

’s four principle determinants. The conceptual model of tripartite efficacy illustrates how self-efficacy beliefs develop within a social environment via two relational efficacy constructs: other-efficacy and relation-inferred self-efficacy (RISE) . Other-efficacy refers to the beliefs an individual

Restricted access

Tuyen Le, Jeffrey D. Graham, Sara King-Dowling, and John Cairney

). This research was largely guided by Lent and Lopez’s ( 2002 ) extension of Bandura’s ( 1997 ) self-efficacy theory and introduced two other forms of efficacy perceptions: other efficacy and relation-inferred self-efficacy (RISE). In a sport and exercise context, other efficacy would refer to what a

Restricted access

Joachim Hüffmeier, Joyce Elena Schleu, and Christoph Nohe

(self-efficacy) × 2 (other efficacy) • Overall, significant effort gains for the weakest swimmer in the relay; effort losses for all other swimmers • Under high self-efficacy and other efficacy conditions: significant effort gains among the weakest swimmers in female relays and among the weakest and

Restricted access

Christopher R. Hill, Deborah L. Feltz, Stephen Samendinger, and Karin A. Pfeiffer

barriers to being physically active. Studies were excluded from the sample if they had a measurement of some other efficacy beliefs (e.g., task self-efficacy or proxy efficacy) but no BSE or the measurement of BSE was deemed insufficient (i.e. a single item measuring BSE, yes-or-no items measuring BSE

Restricted access

Wei-Ting Hsu and Min Pan

, Chua, Pengelley, & Beauchamp, 2012 ). The concept of RISE originated from the tripartite view of efficacy beliefs proposed by Lent and Lopez ( 2002 ). Self-efficacy is the way individuals view their own abilities, other efficacy is the way individuals view others’ abilities, and RISE is one person