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Shaunna L. Taylor, Penny Werthner, and Diane Culver

The complex process of sport coaching is a dynamic and evolving practice that develops over a long period of time. As such, a useful constructivist perspective on lifelong learning is Jarvis’ (2006, 2009) theory of human learning. According to Jarvis, how people learn is at the core of understanding how we can best support educational development. The purpose of the current study is to explore the lifelong learning of one parasport coach who stood out in his feld, and how his coaching practice evolved and developed throughout his life. A thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006) was used to extract themes and examples from three two-hour interviews as well as interviews with key collaborators in his coaching network. The findings reveal a coach whose coaching practice is founded on pragmatic problem solving in the face of a lack in resources; an investment in formal and nonformal adapted activity education at the start of his parasport career; and observation, communication, and relationship-building with his athletes and the parasport community. Suggestions are provided for coach developers on how they might invest resources and create learning opportunities for coaches of athletes with a disability.

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* Stephanie J. Hanrahan * 9 2015 2 2 3 3 317 317 329 329 10.1123/iscj.2014-0155 Coaching In Coaching and Coach Development in New Zealand Lynn Kidman * David Keelty * 9 2015 2 2 3 3 330 330 338 338 10.1123/iscj.2015-0031 Insights The Role of the Coach Developer in Supporting and Guiding Coach Learning

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Orientations E. Whitney G. Moore * Karen Weiller-Abels * 07 04 2020 1 10 2020 28 2 111 118 10.1123/wspaj.2019-0007 wspaj.2019-0007 “I Don’t Really Know What the Magic Wand Is to Get Yourself in There”: Women’s Sense of Organizational Fit as Coach Developers Leanne Norman * 25 10 2019 1 10 2020 28 2 119

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Tarkington J. Newman, Fernando Santos, António Cardoso, and Paulo Pereira

time, funding, and qualified coach developers. Based on these contextual factors, most coaches have PYD as a priority in their philosophies yet fail to develop a coherent set of strategies in their coach practice ( Camiré et al., 2012 ; Lacroix, Camiré, & Trudel, 2008 ; McCallister, Blinde, & Weiss

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Erica Pasquini and Melissa Thompson

authors have been consulting with coaches for 5 years and 15 years, respectively. In our role as coach developers, we take a sociobehavioral approach to working with coaches that has evolved over time. As such, we explore the full context in which the coach is operating. We both have coaching experience

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Hans Vangrunderbeek and Hans Ponnet

–private cooperation with regard to coach education in Belgium. Representatives from recognised (Belgian unitary) sports federations and INEPS/NILOS staff members formed “pedagogical commissions” to define course content, recruit coach developers and organise courses ( Vangrunderbeek, 2013 ). When INEPS

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Jim Denison

coach developer, I source material from texts and conversations and various moments in time. It’s then entering these experiences with the help of Foucault that enables me to understand the forces that have shaped coaching and to see all that coaches’ practices do. But what matters to me most from

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Value of Self-Study to Support Coach Learning Anne O’Dwyer * Richard Bowles * 1 01 2020 7 1 95 101 10.1123/iscj.2018-0105 iscj.2018-0105 “One Piece of a Big Puzzle”: Understanding the Roles of Coach Developers Through Interorganizational Relationships in Canada’s Coach Education System Jonathon

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Tiago Duarte, Diane M. Culver, and Kyle Paquette

others with more than 10 years dedicated to WC ( M  = 6.5). Two coaches worked exclusively with wheelchair curlers. Most coaches participated as curlers, mainly recreationally, with two coaches being wheelchair curlers themselves. Five of the coaches were coach developers, delivering coach education

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Justine B. Allen and Colleen Reid

adopting a process of knowledge transmission from the coach developer to coaches (passive recipients), lacking in context and meaning, and failing to address coaches’ desire for practical activity ( Camiré, Trudel, & Forneris, 2014 ; Nelson et al., 2013 ; Vella et al., 2013 ). However, research has