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Daniel Martin, Craig Sale, Simon B. Cooper, and Kirsty J. Elliott-Sale

2.8 Spotting 3 1.4 Reduced headaches/migraine 3 1.4 Tiredness/fatigue/lethargy 3 1.4 Increased iron 3 1.4 Effect on training/performance 2 0.9 Less ill/sick 3 1.4 Nausea/sickness/vomiting 2 0.9 Resumption of cycle from amenorrhea 3 1.4 Water retention 2 0.9 Reduced stomach cramps 3 1.4 Abnormal

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Nicole Farnsworth, Bryan Holtzman, Lauren McCall, Kristin E. Whitney, Meghan Keating, Laura Moretti, Bridget Quinn, Donna Duffy, and Kathryn E. Ackerman

and reproductive health. Other topics included contraceptive use and sport specialization. “Nutrition” topics incorporated dietary interventions for exercise-related hypothalamic amenorrhea, fad diets in female athletes, as well as energy availability. The “Coaching” and “Allied Health” track included

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participated in the survey. Excluding those not of a reproductive age, 3.5% had amenorrhea, 6.0% oligomenorrhea, 42.1% eumenorrhea, 1.1% polymenorrhea and 48.4% were using hormonal contraception. 80.5% of women reported experiencing menstrual cycle-related symptoms every cycle, and 68.7% have had to alter

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Christopher John Stevens, Megan L. Ross, Julien D. Périard, Brent S. Vallance, and Louise M. Burke

when the athlete was experiencing secondary amenorrhea. Results Rectal Temperature, Ovarian Hormone Influence and Pacing Figure  1 illustrates the peak individual T re achieved across the 4 races and the ovarian hormone influence of the female athletes during each race. Figure  2 illustrates the T

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Holly Thorpe, Julie Brice, and Anna Rolleston

menstruation social discourses as well as how players come to understand menstruation in a sporting context ( Kissling, 1996 ; Moreno-Black & Vallianatos, 2005 ). However, the dominant approach to studying menstruation (and amenorrhea) in sport is from a clinical, medical perspective that is void of the

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Louise M. Burke, Bronwen Lundy, Ida L. Fahrenholtz, and Anna K. Melin

disorders, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis in female athletes ( Nattiv et al., 1994 ; Otis et al., 1997 ), evolved to recognize low EA (LEA) as the cornerstone of impaired menstrual function and suboptimal bone health in these athletes ( Nattiv et al., 2007 ). More recently, LEA was identified as a unifying

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. X-ray revealed a nondisplaced fracture of the left inferior pubic ramus. MRI revealed an additional nondisplaced fracture of the ipsilateral sacral ala. Her medical history was pertinent for NCAH, which was diagnosed in her late teenage years during a workup for primary amenorrhea. She had never

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Alexandra Martin, Hande Hofmann, Clemens Drenowatz, Birgit Wallmann-Sperlich, Billy Sperlich, and Karsten Koehler

resting metabolic rate in exercise-associated amenorrhea is not due to a reduced proportion of highly active metabolic tissue compartments . American Journal of Physiology—Endocrinology and Metabolism, 311 ( 2 ), E480 – 487 . doi: 10.1152/ajpendo.00110.2016 LaForgia , J. , Withers , R.T. , & Gore

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Travis Anderson, Sandra J. Shultz, Nancy I. Williams, Ellen Casey, Zachary Kincaid, Jay L. Lieberman, and Laurie Wideman

or due to menstrual disturbances such as amenorrhea and oligomenorrhea) or if the chosen sampling days limited detectable concentrations. It is also not known if the threshold would be similar for non-collegiate female athletes, since it is unclear if the magnitude of change in relaxin varies based

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Jennifer Hamer, Ben Desbrow, and Chris Irwin

to find more info on supplements for athletes  Supplement policy at Rowing Australia Recipes  Resources for recipes for athletes and where to seek further nutrition support Risks associated with not matching EI with EEE (e.g., poor bone health, fatigue, amenorrhea, poor recovery, increased injury