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Christian Unkelbach and Daniel Memmert

The home advantage is one of the best established phenomena in sports (Courneya & Carron, 1992), and crowd noise has been suggested as one of its determinants (Nevill & Holder, 1999). However, the psychological processes that mediate crowd noise influence and its contribution to the home advantage are still unclear. We propose that crowd noise correlates with the criteria referees have to judge. As crowd noise is a valid cue, referee decisions are strongly influenced by crowd noise. Yet, when audiences are not impartial, a home advantage arises. Using soccer as an exemplar, we show the relevance of this influence in predicting outcomes of real games via a database analysis. Then we experimentally demonstrate the influence of crowd noise on referees’ yellow cards decisions in soccer. Finally, we discuss why the focus on referee decisions is useful, and how more experimental research could benefit investigations of the home advantage.

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Kerry S. Courneya and Albert V. Carron

A home advantage in sport competitions has been well documented. The strength and consistency of the home advantage has made it a popular phenomenon in sport today. Very little systematic research has been carried out, however, and the home advantage remains one of the least understood phenomena in sport. It appears that much of the game location research has been arbitrary, and a clear sense of direction is lacking. The purpose of the present paper is to provide a conceptual framework to organize a comprehensive review of previous game location research and provide direction for future research. The review of literature indicated that the descriptive phase of inquiry has been completed, and it is time to address the underlying mechanisms responsible for the manifestation of the home advantage. Possible methodologies and areas of inquiry are highlighted and discussed.

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Kerry S. Courneya and Albert V. Carron

The present study investigated the effects of season game number, series game number, length of home stand, length of visitor's road trip, home travel, and visitor travel on the home advantage in minor league Double A baseball (N= 1812 games). Initial analysis indicated that the home team won 55.1% of the games (p<.001). Forced-entry multiple regression analyses determined that the combined main and interaction effects of the predictor variables explained less than 1.2% of the variance in win/loss outcome (p>.49). Chi-square analyses revealed that the variable of length of visitor's road trip produced the greatest change in the magnitude of home advantage. When the length of visitor's road trip was cross-tabulated with the length of home stand, me change in home advantage was statistically significant for the home team's later series (p<.05). The implications of these results for the various home advantage explanations are discussed, and future directions for home advantage research are offered.

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E J. McGuire, Kerry S. Courneya, W. Neil Widmeyer, and Albert V. Carron

Little research has been conducted on the role of various behaviors in contributing to the home advantage in sport competitions. The present study investigated whether player aggression mediated the relationship between game location and performance in professional ice hockey. Based on the subject-defined delineation between aggressive and nonaggressive ice hockey penalties established by Widmeyer and Birch, 13 measures were used on data collected from the official game reports and penalty records of the National Hockey League for the 1987–1988 season. Both macroanalytic and microanalytic research strategies and analyses were employed. Initial analysis revealed that home teams won 58.3% of the decided games. Further analyses showed a significant interaction between game location and performance. Home teams incurred more aggressive penalties in games they won whereas visiting teams incurred more aggressive penalties in games they lost. Implications for the potential role of aggression in contributing to the home advantage are discussed.

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Timothy Baghurst and Inza Fort

The purpose of this study was to investigate the home advantage in female collegiate Division I gymnastics by apparatus and determine the performance effect of the Judges’ Assignor System (JAS) introduced in 2005 on each apparatus. Participant teams (N = 15) were selected based on their ranking in the top 25 nationally at the end of each regular season from 2003 to 2007. A repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed home scores for each apparatus were significantly higher than their respective away scores, with the largest differences occurring in the uneven bars and floor exercise. Additionally, a repeated measures ANOVA to assess the JAS impact on scores revealed that home performances yielded higher scores than away for all apparatus, and scores for all apparatus were lower both at home and away since the introduction of JAS. Results are assessed based on current research, and application for judges and coaches is discussed.

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Kerry S. Courneya and Albert V. Carron

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17 17 2 2 Original Research Article Subjective Judging and the Home Advantage in Female Collegiate Division I Gymnastics Timothy Baghurst * M.S. Inza Fort Ed.D. 10 2008 17 17 2 2 3 3 7 7 10.1123/wspaj.17.2.3 Why American Women Play Rugby Sarah K. Fields * J.D., Ph.D. R. Dawn Comstock Ph

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13 1 16 25 10.1123/jsep.13.1.16 Changes in Cognitive Strategies and Motor Skill in Tennis Sue L. McPherson * Karen E. French * 3 1991 13 1 26 41 10.1123/jsep.13.1.26 Effects of Travel and Length of Home Stand/Road Trip on tie Home Advantage Kerry S. Courneya * Albert V. Carron * 3 1991 13 1

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Contributes to the Home Advantage Christian Unkelbach * Daniel Memmert * 8 2010 32 4 483 498 10.1123/jsep.32.4.483 Interactive Effects of Different Visual Imagery Perspectives and Narcissism on Motor Performance Ross Roberts * Nichola Callow * Lew Hardy * Tim Woodman * Laura Thomas * 8 2010 32 4

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Research Status of the Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology , 1985–1990 Diane L. Gill * 3 1992 14 1 1 12 10.1123/jsep.14.1.1 The Home Advantage In Sport Competitions: A Literature Review Kerry S. Courneya * Albert V. Carron * 3 1992 14 1 13 27 10.1123/jsep.14.1.13 Fan Support of Sport