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Eldon E. Snyder and Dean A. Purdy

This study substantiates the notion of a home advantage for the sport of basketball. The findings indicate that home teams win 66% of their games and this advantage is as important for game outcomes as team quality. However, the advantage varies according to the quality of home and visiting teams. The paper provides a review of the Durkheimian perspective, which views the home team as a representative of the home collectivity that draws support from its fans. Additionally, the home advantage may be seen as an expression of Goffman, whereby the players are highly motivated to respond in a manner that will maintain their proper demeanor and self-esteem.

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Jr. Russell E. Ward

Durkheim’s discussion on ritual and Goffman’s theoretical work on first impressions are used to predict superior performance among home teams on opening day. Information on opening day game outcomes is compiled and compared with the results of regular season and championship play. The analysis reveals a greater home advantage for teams playing in opening day games than for home teams competing in regular season or championship games. When controlling for the effect of stadium attendance on the home advantage, the opening day home advantage exceeds that of championship competition. The results suggest that ritual activity and concerns for first impression management may be factors that condition home team performance, offering support for the assertion that performance is partly a social product. Further home advantage research can direct attention to cross-cultural differences in the opening day home advantage and focus on qualitative data collection to supplement the current abundance of archival data.

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D. Randall Smith, Anthony Ciacciarelli, Jennifer Serzan, and Danielle Lambert

That the home team wins more than half its games is well-established. One factor said to produce this home advantage is travel between venues, which is seen as disruptive for the visiting team. Unfortunately, the media and athletes have been more supportive of travel effects than the research literature. While players continue to speculate that travel matters, empirical results find little support for travel factors. In the present paper we demonstrate that, at least for some professional sports, team travel can exert a very small influence on the outcome of the contest even after the quality of the teams competing is controlled. We conclude, however, that the belief that some factors confer an advantage to the home team is more the product of social forces than the influence those factors regularly have on game outcomes.

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Timothy Baghurst and Inza Fort

The purpose of this study was to investigate the home advantage in female collegiate Division I gymnastics by apparatus and determine the performance effect of the Judges’ Assignor System (JAS) introduced in 2005 on each apparatus. Participant teams (N = 15) were selected based on their ranking in the top 25 nationally at the end of each regular season from 2003 to 2007. A repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed home scores for each apparatus were significantly higher than their respective away scores, with the largest differences occurring in the uneven bars and floor exercise. Additionally, a repeated measures ANOVA to assess the JAS impact on scores revealed that home performances yielded higher scores than away for all apparatus, and scores for all apparatus were lower both at home and away since the introduction of JAS. Results are assessed based on current research, and application for judges and coaches is discussed.

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* D. Stanley Eitzen * 9 1998 15 3 263 278 10.1123/ssj.15.3.263 Rituals, First Impressions, and the Opening Day Home Advantage Russell E. Ward Jr. * 9 1998 15 3 279 293 10.1123/ssj.15.3.279 ssj Sociology of Sport Journal 0741-1235 1543-2785 1998 15 3 10.1123/ssj.1998.15.issue-3 Presidential

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Physicalities Lisa McDermott * 12 2000 17 4 331 363 10.1123/ssj.17.4.331 Travel and the Home Advantage in Professional Sports D. Randall Smith * Anthony Ciacciarelli * Jennifer Serzan * Danielle Lambert * 12 2000 17 4 364 385 10.1123/ssj.17.4.364 Reading between the Lines: A Discursive Analysis of the

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17 17 2 2 Original Research Article Subjective Judging and the Home Advantage in Female Collegiate Division I Gymnastics Timothy Baghurst * M.S. Inza Fort Ed.D. 10 2008 17 17 2 2 3 3 7 7 10.1123/wspaj.17.2.3 Why American Women Play Rugby Sarah K. Fields * J.D., Ph.D. R. Dawn Comstock Ph

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Mari-Kristin Sisjord 12 1985 2 4 345 351 10.1123/ssj.2.4.345 Research Notes & Comments The Home Advantage in Collegiate Basketball Eldon E. Snyder * Dean A. Purdy * 12 1985 2 4 352 356 10.1123/ssj.2.4.352 Research Understanding Labor as a Concept for the Study of Sport Rob Beamish 12 1985 2 4

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Richard J. Paulsen

-018-9595-5 10.1007/s11293-018-9595-5 Pendergast , C. ( 1999 ). The provision of incentives in firms . Journal of Economic Literature, 37 ( 1 ), 7 – 63 . doi:10.1257/jel.37.1.7 10.1257/jel.37.1.7 Pollard , R. ( 2002 ). Evidence of a reduced home advantage when a team moves to a new stadium . Journal

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Leeann M. Lower-Hoppe, Kyle B. Heuett, Tarkington J. Newman, and Shea M. Brgoch

Exercise Psychology, 7 ( 4 ), 465 – 487 . doi:10.1080/1612197X.2009.9671920 10.1080/1612197X.2009.9671920 Pollard , R. ( 2008 ). Home advantage in football: A current review of an unsolved puzzle . Open Sports Sciences Journal, 1, 12 – 14 . doi:10.2174/1875399X00801010012 10.2174/1875399X