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Kathryn I. Clark, Thomas J. Templin, and Taylor J. Lundberg

The purpose of this paper was to provide insight into the development of an engaging, interactive, and successful class in scientific writing in the Movement Science program in the School of Kinesiology at the University of Michigan. This class is grounded in learning the art and science of scientific argumentation. In this paper, the authors provide an overview of the evolution of the class over the past decade and present elements of the class that have proven successful in the education of Movement Science students. The paper concludes with the recommendation that the American Kinesiology Association include a writing course such as the one described here in its recommendations for the undergraduate core curriculum in relation to those learning objectives tied to research proficiency.

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David R. Bassett, Jeffrey T. Fairbrother, Lynn B. Panton, Philip E. Martin, and Ann M. Swartz

take more elective courses outside the department, and some elective courses within the department have been eliminated. It is important, however, to maintain the core elements of the kinesiology undergraduate curriculum as described by Chodzko-Zajko ( 2014 ). Teaching large classes is a challenge, but

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Melinda A. Solmon, Kim C. Graber, Amelia Mays Woods, Nancy I. Williams, Thomas J. Templin, Sarah L. Price, and Alison Weimer

programs across the country. Most importantly, the practice of physical activity is considered one of the core elements of the Kinesiology undergraduate curriculum ( American Kinesiology Association, 2020 ). Teaching our students how to educate people in order to be physically active is fundamental to the