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Charles Macaulay, Joseph Cooper, and Shaun Dougherty

There are two cultural narratives often purported within the American sports cultures of basketball and football. First, those participating within these sports are African American athletes from poor communities lacking educational and economic opportunities. Second, the meritocratic myth perpetuating American society feeds the notion no matter where an individual is from their talent will elevate them to the next level. There have already been a few studies who have challenged these myths. This study seeks to continue the conversation by collecting community data on 7,670 high school football recruits for the years 2000 to 2016. This study seeks to provide a broad overview of the interscholastic football landscape as well as determine production levels of schools. This study finds that while players are recruited from a diverse range of communities and school types, as a school becomes more productive they tend to be located within wealthier urban communities, have a diverse student body, and have a higher likelihood of being a private school.

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Brian P. McCullough, Madeleine Orr, and Nicholas M. Watanabe

.g., increased auto emissions, displacement). Furthermore, sport facilities are commonly built in lower socioeconomic areas of the city, causing the city’s poor communities to be exposed to the environmental impact of construction, operations, and demolition of facilities more than other areas of the city ( Sze, 2009

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Earl Smith and Angela J. Hattery

Blacks can do so ( Korver-Glenn, 2018 ). If neighborhoods were truly open for racial integration, then it would not be the case that two decades into the 21st century, affluent Black families are living in deeply concentrated poor communities and neighborhoods while similarly situated Whites live in

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Brian P. McCullough, Madeleine Orr, and Timothy Kellison

, those who bear the brunt of these negative externalities are poor communities (e.g., displacement, pollution; Sze, 2009 ; Wallace, 2012 ). This is important, as it demonstrates how environmental injustices can be promulgated by efforts of the sport industry. Vulnerability, Climate Capacity, and