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Gustavo Sandri Heidner, Patrick M. Rider, J.C. Mizelle, Caitlin M. O’Connell, Nicholas P. Murray, and Zachary J. Domire

The use of virtual reality (VR) in the clinical setting has increased substantially in recent years. 1 It has been established as an efficacious tool for balance and gait rehabilitation in neurological patients and provides improved benefits when combined with conventional rehabilitation. 2 A

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Chanel T. LoJacono, Ryan P. MacPherson, Nikita A. Kuznetsov, Louisa D. Raisbeck, Scott E. Ross, and Christopher K. Rhea

new and more advanced rehabilitation techniques, one of which is virtual reality. The use of virtual reality is defined as a simulation of a real environment that is generated through computer software and is experienced by the user through a human-machine interface ( Holden, 2005 ). From a motor

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Beatriz Caruso Soares, Jéssica Maria Ribeiro Bacha, Daniel Donadio Mello, Emerson Galves Moretto, Tatiana Fonseca, Karina Santos Vieira, Amanda Franchi de Lima, Belinda Lange, Camila Torriani-Pasin, Roseli de Deus Lopes, and José Eduardo Pompeu

capturing body movements without attaching sensors and providing freedom to move within a defined area. Immersive virtual reality can provide more natural sensory information and a greater sense of presence (feeling of “being there”). It can enhance the sensorimotor experience and simulate challenging

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Katherine L. Hsieh, Yaejin Moon, Vignesh Ramkrishnan, Rama Ratnam, and Jacob J. Sosnoff

measure postural stability, such as the functional reach task, 6 trunk sway, 7 and center of pressure (COP) measures (ie, velocity, area). 8 One method of measuring postural stability is determining virtual time to contact (VTC). VTC provides an estimate of how long it would take an individual to lose

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Yongwoo Lee, Wonjae Choi, Kyeongjin Lee, Changho Song, and Seungwon Lee

; Iwamoto et al., 2009 ). However, a simple exercise may become monotonous or boring to older adults. Alternatively, augmented reality, virtual reality, and video-game-based training are available ( de Bruin, Schoene, Pichierri, & Smith, 2010 ; Duque et al., 2013 ). In particular, previous studies have

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Alyson B. Harding, Nancy W. Glynn, Stephanie A. Studenski, Philippa J. Clarke, Ayushi A. Divecha, and Andrea L. Rosso

are labor intensive. With the increasing availability of free digital satellite and omnidirectional imagery, many studies now conduct virtual audits. Interrater reliability between virtual and field audits shows substantial to near perfect agreement for most audited items, suggesting that virtual

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Anat V. Lubetzky, Bryan D. Hujsak, Gene Fu, and Ken Perlin

are limited to the research laboratory setting and cannot be utilized in the clinic. Recent advances in virtual reality (VR) technology such as the Oculus Rift (Oculus VR, LLC; Menlo Park, CA) and the HTC Vive (HTC Corporation, New Taipei City, Taiwan) could potentially help identify movement patterns

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Guan-Bo Chen, Che-Wei Lin, Hung-Ya Huang, Yi-Jhen Wu, Hung-Tzu Su, Shu-Fen Sun, and Sheng-Hui Tuan

-practiced, overwhelming, and task-oriented exercises ( Winstein et al., 2016 ). Achieving these principles would demand devoting time, workforce, and money to rehabilitation. Interactive video gaming and virtual reality (VR) provide new platforms for the delivery of exercise programs, particularly in settings facing

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Wonjae Choi and Seungwon Lee

advantages of reducing age-related physical and cognitive deterioration, but it has a safety issue considering that it should be performed on water. Virtual reality is used to safely simulate natural motion ( Bohil, Alicea, & Biocca, 2011 ), ensure consistent and planned application of standardized

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Kevin R. Ford, Anh-Dung Nguyen, Eric J. Hegedus, and Jeffrey B. Taylor

Virtual environments with real-time feedback can simulate extrinsic goals that mimic real life conditions. The purpose was to compare jump performance and biomechanics with a physical overhead goal (POG) and with a virtual overhead goal (VOG). Fourteen female subjects participated (age: 18.8 ± 1.1 years, height: 163.2 ± 8.1 cm, weight 63.0 ± 7.9 kg). Sagittal plane trunk, hip, and knee biomechanics were calculated during the landing and take-off phases of drop vertical jump with different goal conditions. Repeated-measures ANOVAs determined differences between goal conditions. Vertical jump height displacement was not different during VOG compared with POG. Greater hip extensor moment (P < .001*) and hip angular impulse (P < .004*) were found during VOG compared with POG. Subjects landed more erect with less magnitude of trunk flexion (P = .002*) during POG compared with VOG. A virtual target can optimize jump height and promote increased hip moments and trunk flexion. This may be a useful alternative to physical targets to improve performance during certain biomechanical testing, screening, and training conditions.