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  • Author: Amelia M. Lee x
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Jerry R. Thomas, Damon Andrew, Patricia A. Moran, Wayne Miller and Amelia M. Lee

In today’s challenging economic climate at most universities, kinesiology administrators are becoming increasingly aware of the need to participate in activities that will generate alternative revenue sources related to their academic mission. The ways deans and development officers communicate with alumni, potential donors, upper administrative leaders, and legislatures will all impact how successful the efforts to develop funds and partnerships will be. Successful fundraisers are those who can generate strategic alliances, create and market a plan that relates needs to societal issues of public interest and university priorities, and are able to identify partnerships that will produce an increase in resources. This paper provides strategies for identifying and connecting with key donors, building partnerships, developing the plan and cultivating internal and external audiences, aligning needs with university priorities, and working with legislatures.

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Melinda A. Solmon, Terry Worthy, Amelia M. Lee and Jo A. Carter

This investigation examined the teaching perspectives of student teachers and described the interplay between their role identities and teaching contexts. Principal findings were (a) investigators were able to describe definable characteristics of teacher role identity and assess the relative strength of the role based on clarity of teacher image and level of confidence, (b) interaction patterns were observable and varied according to individual teacher and context, (c) subjects with stronger TRIs were able to negotiate for and closely approximate a real teaching role by implementing their own style, and (d) subjects with weaker TRIs relied heavily on their cooperating teachers by mimicking their teaching styles and routines. In conclusion, the findings of this study support the view of the prospective teacher as an active agent in controlling the direction of biography and social structure in the socialization process.

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Judith E. Rink, Karen French, Amelia M. Lee, Melinda A. Solmon and Susan K. Lynn

Understanding how the knowledge structures of preservice teachers develop as expertise is acquired would seem to be an important aspect of teacher preparation. The purpose of this study was to compare the pedagogical knowledge structures about effective teaching of preservice teachers and teacher educators in the professional preparation programs of two different institutions. Two groups of preservice teachers at two different points in their preparation program at each of the two institutions were asked to complete a concept map (Roehler et al., 1987) about effective teaching. One group completed the concept map just after the first teaching methods course, and the other group completed the map just prior to student teaching. These data were compared with concept maps of teacher educators at each institution. Quantitative and qualitative data revealed differences between the groups of preservice teachers and between the preservice teachers and the teacher educators.

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Melinda A. Solmon, Amelia M. Lee, Donald Belcher, Louis Harrison Jr. and Lori Wells

Beliefs about gender appropriateness and conceptions of ability have been identified as powerful influences on beliefs about competence. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction of those two factors on competence beliefs in physical activity. Participants completed a survey about the sport of hockey, watched a video of a specific hockey skill, and then responded to questions about the skill. Males expressed more confidence in their ability to learn hockey than females, but females who perceived the activity to be gender neutral were more confident in their ability to learn hockey than females who believed the activity was predominantly for males. Participants’ explanations of their beliefs about gender appropriateness and confidence shed light on how competence beliefs are affected by perceptions of gender appropriateness and conceptions of ability.