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Mark Beauchamp, David E. Conroy, Panteleimon Ekkekakis, Kim Gammage, Marc V. Jones, Ralph Maddison and Christopher Spray

Edited by David Lavallee

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Mark Beauchamp, David E. Conroy, Panteleimon Ekkekakis, Kim Gammage, Marc V. Jones, Ralph Maddison and Christopher Spray

Edited by David Lavallee

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Marc V. Jones, Andrew M. Lane, Steven R. Bray, Mark Uphill and James Catlin

The present paper outlines the development of a sport-specific measure of precompetitive emotion to assess anger, anxiety, dejection, excitement, and happiness. Face, content, factorial, and concurrent validity were examined over four stages. Stage 1 had 264 athletes complete an open-ended questionnaire to identify emotions experienced in sport. The item pool was extended through the inclusion of additional items taken from the literature. In Stage 2 a total of 148 athletes verified the item pool while a separate sample of 49 athletes indicated the extent to which items were representative of the emotions anger, anxiety, dejection, excitement, and happiness. Stage 3 had 518 athletes complete a provisional Sport Emotion Questionnaire (SEQ) before competition. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that a 22-item and 5-fac-tor structure provided acceptable model fit. Results from Stage 4 supported the criterion validity of the SEQ. The SEQ is proposed as a valid measure of precompetitive emotion for use in sport settings.

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Mark Beauchamp, David E. Conroy, Panteleimon Ekkekakis, Kim Gammage, Marc V. Jones, Ralph Maddison and Christopher Spray

Edited by David Lavallee

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Mark Beauchamp, Panteleimon Ekkekakis, Kim Gammage, Marc V. Jones, Ralph Maddison, Scott Martin and Christopher Spray

Edited by David Lavallee

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Mark Beauchamp, Panteleimon Ekkekakis, Kim Gammage, Marc V. Jones, Ralph Maddison, Scott Martin and Christopher Spray

Edited by David Lavallee

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Mark Beauchamp, Panteleimon Ekkekakis, Kim Gammage, Marc V. Jones, Ralph Maddison, Scott Martin and Christopher Spray

Edited by David Lavallee

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Martin J. Turner, Marc V. Jones, David Sheffield, Matthew J. Slater, Jamie B. Barker and James J. Bell

This study assessed whether cardiovascular (CV) reactivity patterns indexing challenge and threat states predicted batting performance in elite male county (N = 12) and national (N = 30) academy cricketers. Participants completed a batting test under pressure, before which CV reactivity was recorded in response to ego-threatening audio instructions. Self-reported self-efficacy, control, achievement goals, and emotions were also assessed. Challenge CV reactivity predicted superior performance in the Batting Test, compared with threat CV reactivity. The relationships between self-report measures and CV reactivity, and self-report measures and performance were inconsistent. A small subsample of participants who exhibited threat CV reactivity, but performed well, reported greater self-efficacy than participants who exhibited threat CV reactivity, but performed poorly. Also a small subsample of participants who exhibited challenge reactivity, but performed poorly, had higher avoidance goals than participants with challenge reactivity who performed well. The mechanisms for the observed relationship between CV reactivity and performance are discussed alongside implications for future research and applied practice.