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Michael W. Metzler and Thomas J. Templin

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Edited by Thomas J. Templin and David C. Griffey

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K. Andrew Richards and Thomas J. Templin

Using occupational socialization theory, this investigation describes the socialization of Janet, an induction phase physical education (PE) teacher. Special attention was given to the forms of induction assistance Janet was exposed to during her first two years at Liberty Middle School. Data were collected through seven interviews with Janet and interviews with Janet’s mentor, principal, and assistant superintendent. Analyses were conducted using inductive analysis and the constant comparative method. Results indicate that Janet was exposed to several forms of assistance including a state wide induction assistance initiative called the State Mentoring and Assessment Program (S-MAP). She found the informal assistance provided by her teaching colleague and the community of practice they formed to be among the most important elements of her induction, and she was critical of the formal support she received through the S-MAP.

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K. Andrew R. Richards and Thomas J. Templin

Chapter 2 overviewed the teacher pipeline and documented some of the challenges faced by the physical education profession in relation to teacher education recruitment and retention. Given declining program enrollments and the elimination of some once-prominent programs, a theory of action is recommended for understanding how the field can better recruit and retain diverse, highly qualified preservice teachers. In this chapter, we argue that occupational socialization theory presents one such theory of action. We begin with an overview of the theory in a general sense and then discuss possible implications for preservice teacher recruitment and retention. Recommended recruitment efforts focus on leveraging both physical education teacher education faculty members and in-service teachers as agents of recruitment; retention strategies relate to developing field-based teacher education programs that adopt a constructivist approach to teaching and learning. We conclude by describing how occupational socialization theory relates to guide research presented within this monograph.

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David B. Klenosky, Thomas J. Templin and Josh A. Troutmam

This paper reports the results of an empirical study that draws on a means-end perspective to examine the factors influencing the school choice decisions of collegiate student athletes. A sample of 27 NCAA Division I collegiate football players were questioned to identify the attributes that differentiated the school they selected from the others they had considered attending. The interviewing technique known as laddering was then used to link the salient attributes of the chosen school to the consequences and personal values important to the athlete. An analysis of the resulting data provided unique insight into the means-end relationships that underlie students' selection of competing athletic programs. A discussion of the study findings outlined the implications of this investigation and the means-end approach for future recruiting and research efforts.

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Thomas J. Templin, Jason R. Carter and Kim C. Graber

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K. Andrew R. Richards, Thomas J. Templin and Kim Graber

Occupational socialization theory describes the acculturation, professional preparation, and organizational socialization of physical education teachers and addresses factors that contribute to their decisions and behaviors. Utilizing occupational socialization theory as a grounding framework, this paper summarizes research conducted on teacher socialization in physical education and provides recommendations for future research. Each of the three phases of socialization is reviewed as are related constructs. The paper concludes with a discussion of socialization into physical education more generally and addresses the limitations of the current body of literature. Future researchers are encouraged to continue using occupational socialization theory as a framework though which to understand the careers and pedagogical decisions of physical education teachers.

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K. Andrew R. Richards, Andrew D. Eberline and Thomas J. Templin

Secondary professional socialization is a phase of occupational socialization theory that focuses on graduate education in preparation for a career in academia. Due to the need to present and publish research and make professional contacts, professional organizations likely serve an important socializing function during graduate education. The purpose of this exploratory study was to understand graduate students’ perspectives of participating in professional organizations. Participants included 16 health and physical education graduate students who shared their experiences in focus group interviews. Data were analyzed using constant comparison and inductive analysis. Results indicate graduate students become involved in professional organizations primarily due to faculty encouragement. Participants highlighted networking as a benefit of involvement, and viewed professional learning and opportunities to present research as important to their career development. Results are discussed through the lens of occupational socialization theory, and limitations and implications for graduate student training are shared.

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Andrew C. Sparkes, Thomas J. Templin and Paul G. Schempp

For all schools, the priority item always to be on the agenda, is the quality of life in the workplace—its assessment and improvement. Creating a satisfying place of work for the individuals who inhabit schools is good in its own right, but it appears also to be necessary to maintain a productive educational environment. (Goodlad, 1983, p. 59)

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Thomas J. Templin, Bevan Grant, Andrew Sparkes and Paul Schempp

This case study focuses on a late career, male teacher/coach and reveals the multidimensionality of his life and career. It demonstrates the influence of significant career and life events, as well as the social context in which the teacher/coach works. Overall, a life history approach describes the paradox of the employment/accommodation of a veteran elementary teacher as a physical educator at the secondary school in which he coaches. This study reveals the marginality of physical education and its teachers at the secondary school level in contrast to the importance of interscholastic athletics and those who serve in varsity coaching roles. The study shows how the teacher studied is both a good-fit and a weak-fit stayer (Yee, 1990). Equally, it demonstrates how one’s conception of self (Nias, 1985) relates to professional and personal circumstance. Finally, the research demonstrates the value of and need for biographical research in sport pedagogy.