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  • Author: Annette J. Raynor x
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Annette J. Raynor

The patellar tendon reflex (PTR) and simple visual reaction time (VRT) were fractionated and compared in 40 subjects with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and normal coordination (NC) in two age groups. Four equal groups of subjects, 6 years DCD (6DCD), 6 years NC (6NC), 9 years DCD (9DCD), and 9 years NC (9NC) were compared using ANOVA for the main effects of coordination and age. PTR and its components of reflex latency and motor time were not significantly affected by the level of coordination; however, a significant coordination by age interaction (p < .05) revealed an increased motor time in the 6DCD group. VRT, premotor time, and motor time were all significantly (p < .05) increased in children with DCD; the increased VRT and premotor time support earlier findings, whereas the increased motor time has not previously been found. These findings suggest that the processing of reflexive and volitional responses by children with DCD differs from that of their NC peers.

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Annette J. Raynor, Fiona Iredale, Robert Crowther, Jane White and Julie Dare

Regular physical activity has multiple benefits for older adults, including improved physical, cognitive, and psychosocial health. This exploratory study investigated the benefits of a 12-week exercise program for older adults (n = 11 control and n = 13 intervention) living in a residential aged care facility in Perth, Western Australia. The program, prescribed and delivered by an accredited exercise physiologist, aimed to maintain or improve participants’ physical capacity. It comprised one-on-one exercise sessions (1 hr × 2 days/week × 12 weeks), involving a components-approach intervention. Physical performance measures (balance, strength, flexibility, and mobility) were assessed preintervention and postintervention. Qualitative interviews postintervention with residents participating in the exercise intervention, and with family members, staff, and research team members, explored barriers and enablers to participation and perceived psychosocial outcomes. Findings indicate the program provided physical benefits and enhanced social engagement for participants, illustrating the value of providing exercise physiology services in the aged care sector.