Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for :

  • Author: Brendan Burkett x
  • Psychology and Behavior in Sport/Exercise x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Vaughan Patrick Nicholson, Mark McKean, John Lowe, Christine Fawcett, and Brendan Burkett

Objective:

To determine the effectiveness of unsupervised Nintendo Wii Fit balance training in older adults.

Methods:

Forty-one older adults were recruited from local retirement villages and educational settings to participate in a six-week two-group repeated measures study. The Wii group (n = 19, 75 ± 6 years) undertook 30 min of unsupervised Wii balance gaming three times per week in their retirement village while the comparison group (n = 22, 74 ± 5 years) continued with their usual exercise program. Participants’ balance abilities were assessed pre- and postintervention.

Results:

The Wii Fit group demonstrated significant improvements (P < .05) in timed up-and-go, left single-leg balance, lateral reach (left and right), and gait speed compared with the comparison group. Reported levels of enjoyment following game play increased during the study.

Conclusion:

Six weeks of unsupervised Wii balance training is an effective modality for improving balance in independent older adults.

Restricted access

Anna C. Severin, Brendan J. Burkett, Mark R. McKean, Aaron N. Wiegand, and Mark G.L. Sayers

This study examined the effect of water immersion on trunk and lower limb kinematics during squat exercises in older participants. A total of 24 active older adults (71.4 ± 5.4 years) performed squats and split squats on land and while partially submerged in water. Inertial sensors (100 Hz) were used to record trunk and lower body kinematics. Water immersion increased the squat depth (squat: p = .028, d = 0.63 and split squat: p = .005, d = 0.83) and reduced the trunk flexion range (squat: p = .006, d = 0.76 and split squat: p < .001, d = 1.35) during both exercises. In addition, water immersion increased the hip range of motion during the split squat (p = .002, d = 0.94). Waveform analyses also indicated differences in the timing of the movements. These results showed that water-based exercise generates a different exercise outcome and appears to provide an alternative option for older adults, enabling exercisers to perform these tasks in a manner not possible on land.